Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

228 notes

design-is-fine:

Giovanni Reder, Portrait of the cat Armellino, 1750. Oil on canvas. The first known painting of an individual cat. The italian poetess Alessandra Forteguerra commissioned the artwork of her beloved tom cat. Museo di Roma.

Cats in art. This is what the internet is for, right?

design-is-fine:

Giovanni Reder, Portrait of the cat Armellino, 1750. Oil on canvas. The first known painting of an individual cat. The italian poetess Alessandra Forteguerra commissioned the artwork of her beloved tom cat. Museo di Roma.

Cats in art. This is what the internet is for, right?

Filed under 18th-century cats

136 notes

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
After yesterday, I figured I’d better reassure you that—really—some cat art isn’t unbearably silly.
This, for example, is Giuseppe Maria Crespi’s The Kitchenmaid, from the early 18th century.
According to the Getty, “Crespi’s work reflects his sincerity, tenderness, and keen observation of nature, transformed by startling light effects and thick, fluid application of paint.”
The glowing brilliance of the kitchenmaid herself and the soft little cat on the chair uphold the Getty’s claim.
There’s something kind of unusual about the style, though.
And indeed, The Encyclopædia Britannica writes that Crespi was an “Italian Baroque painter who broke dramatically with the formal academic tradition to achieve a direct and immediate approach to his subject matter that was unparalleled at the time.”
Never has a rebel looked so endearingly quaint.

Cats in art. This is what the internet is for, right?

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

After yesterday, I figured I’d better reassure you that—really—some cat art isn’t unbearably silly.

This, for example, is Giuseppe Maria Crespi’s The Kitchenmaid, from the early 18th century.

According to the Getty, “Crespi’s work reflects his sincerity, tenderness, and keen observation of nature, transformed by startling light effects and thick, fluid application of paint.”

The glowing brilliance of the kitchenmaid herself and the soft little cat on the chair uphold the Getty’s claim.

There’s something kind of unusual about the style, though.

And indeed, The Encyclopædia Britannica writes that Crespi was an “Italian Baroque painter who broke dramatically with the formal academic tradition to achieve a direct and immediate approach to his subject matter that was unparalleled at the time.”

Never has a rebel looked so endearingly quaint.

Cats in art. This is what the internet is for, right?

Filed under 18th-century cats

150 notes

artmastered:

Thomas Gainsborough, The Painter’s Daughters with a Cat, c.1760-61, oil on canvas, The National Gallery
Here are Mary and Margaret Gainsborough, aged between 9 and 10, and 8 and 9 respectively. The somewhat vicious-looking cat, referenced in the painting’s title, has been left unfinished. 

Cats in art. This is what the internet is for, right?

artmastered:

Thomas Gainsborough, The Painter’s Daughters with a Cat, c.1760-61, oil on canvas, The National Gallery

Here are Mary and Margaret Gainsborough, aged between 9 and 10, and 8 and 9 respectively. The somewhat vicious-looking cat, referenced in the painting’s title, has been left unfinished. 

Cats in art. This is what the internet is for, right?

Filed under 18th-century cats

416 notes

biomedicalephemera:

Simia nigra magnitudinis mediae (Black monkey of medium size) - Black or Red-Faced Spider Monkey [Ateles fusciceps]
Think Koko the Gorilla was the first primate to keep a pet? Think again! Many Old-World and New-World primates, especially when kept in captivity, have been known to care for and keep pets around, even when they’re allowed to live with a proper clan of their own kind.
Though all primates (aside from the Gelada baboon) are known to be at least partially carnivorous, sometimes even with members of their own species, “adopted” pets (generally cats) are not killed, and have been defended to the death by members of the primate clan.
Pets are often helpful to many captive monkeys and apes, especially when they live solitary or near-solitary lives. A solitary confinement is known to cause significant stereotypic behavior and extreme  stress in most primates, but living with an accepted pet (properly taken care of by a caretaker) has been shown to significantly reduce that burden. It’s not a replacement for group living, of course, but it has been known since the Late Enlightenment that pets increase the quality of life (and decrease the resistance to captivity) of primates both large and small.
Verzameling van uitlandsche en zeldzaame vogelen. G. Edwards, M. Catesby, J. M. Seligmann, 1776.

Cat (and monkey). This is what the internet is for, right?

biomedicalephemera:

Simia nigra magnitudinis mediae (Black monkey of medium size) - Black or Red-Faced Spider Monkey [Ateles fusciceps]

Think Koko the Gorilla was the first primate to keep a pet? Think again! Many Old-World and New-World primates, especially when kept in captivity, have been known to care for and keep pets around, even when they’re allowed to live with a proper clan of their own kind.

Though all primates (aside from the Gelada baboon) are known to be at least partially carnivorous, sometimes even with members of their own species, “adopted” pets (generally cats) are not killed, and have been defended to the death by members of the primate clan.

Pets are often helpful to many captive monkeys and apes, especially when they live solitary or near-solitary lives. A solitary confinement is known to cause significant stereotypic behavior and extreme  stress in most primates, but living with an accepted pet (properly taken care of by a caretaker) has been shown to significantly reduce that burden. It’s not a replacement for group living, of course, but it has been known since the Late Enlightenment that pets increase the quality of life (and decrease the resistance to captivity) of primates both large and small.

Verzameling van uitlandsche en zeldzaame vogelen. G. Edwards, M. Catesby, J. M. Seligmann, 1776.

Cat (and monkey). This is what the internet is for, right?

Filed under 18th-century cats