Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

8 notes

Frontispiece to an 18th-century edition of Aesop’s Fables. I think the artist was trying to squeeze every fable into this one image. How many different fables do you recognize here?
This illustration comes from Fables, of Aesop and other eminent mythologists: with morals and reflexions. By Sir Roger L’Estrange, Kt. (London: R. Sare, A. and J. Churchil, D. Brown, T. Goodwin, M. Wotton, [and 4 others in London], 1704)
Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction, the McMaster Humanities journal, online here with an institutional subscription:
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Frontispiece to an 18th-century edition of Aesop’s Fables. I think the artist was trying to squeeze every fable into this one image. How many different fables do you recognize here?

This illustration comes from Fables, of Aesop and other eminent mythologists: with morals and reflexions. By Sir Roger L’Estrange, Kt. (London: R. Sare, A. and J. Churchil, D. Brown, T. Goodwin, M. Wotton, [and 4 others in London], 1704)

Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction, the McMaster Humanities journal, online here with an institutional subscription:

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under aesops fables 18th-century engraving Eighteenth-Century Fiction aesop fable

267 notes

books0977:

Portrait of Miss Constable (1787). George Romney (English, 1734–1802). Oil on canvas. Museu Calouste Gulbenkian. 
Miss Constable is wearing a bergère (French for shepherdess) hat, a flat-brimmed straw hat with a shallow crown, usually trimmed with ribbon and flowers. It could be worn in various ways with the brim folded back or turned up or down. It was widely worn in the mid-18th century, and versions may be seen in many British and French paintings of the period.

More George Romney! I adore his style.

books0977:

Portrait of Miss Constable (1787). George Romney (English, 1734–1802). Oil on canvas. Museu Calouste Gulbenkian. 

Miss Constable is wearing a bergère (French for shepherdess) hat, a flat-brimmed straw hat with a shallow crown, usually trimmed with ribbon and flowers. It could be worn in various ways with the brim folded back or turned up or down. It was widely worn in the mid-18th century, and versions may be seen in many British and French paintings of the period.

More George Romney! I adore his style.

Filed under 18th-Century Art george romney

73 notes

congressarchives:

The tradesmen and manufacturers in Baltimore began drafting this petition asking for duties on certain imported goods in February 1789, before Congress had even met for the first time. The petition is from approximately 750 citizens, and received in Congress on April 11, 1789.  The new revenue system passed by the First Congress included four acts that related to foreign trade: the Impost Act, HR 2; the Tonnage Act, HR 5; the Collection Act, HR 11; and the Coasting Act, HR 16.
Petition of the Tradesmen, Manufacturers, and Others of Baltimore, 4/11/1789, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives (NAID 7788930)

Reblogging a few 18th-century posts today.

congressarchives:

The tradesmen and manufacturers in Baltimore began drafting this petition asking for duties on certain imported goods in February 1789, before Congress had even met for the first time. The petition is from approximately 750 citizens, and received in Congress on April 11, 1789.  The new revenue system passed by the First Congress included four acts that related to foreign trade: the Impost Act, HR 2; the Tonnage Act, HR 5; the Collection Act, HR 11; and the Coasting Act, HR 16.

Petition of the Tradesmen, Manufacturers, and Others of Baltimore, 4/11/1789, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives (NAID 7788930)

Reblogging a few 18th-century posts today.

(via madtomedgar)

Filed under US Congress archives Baltimore 18thcentury

6 notes

Although this engraving identifies the game as “Bomble [Bumble] Puppy,” it looks more like bocce to me. This engraving is from James Godby, Italian Scenery: representing the manners, customs, and amusements of the different states of Itlay containing thirty-two coloured engravings (London: Edward Ormer, 1806).
Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal on Project MUSE via institutional subscription:
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Although this engraving identifies the game as “Bomble [Bumble] Puppy,” it looks more like bocce to me. This engraving is from James Godby, Italian Scenery: representing the manners, customs, and amusements of the different states of Itlay containing thirty-two coloured engravings (London: Edward Ormer, 1806).

Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal on Project MUSE via institutional subscription:

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under Eighteenth-Century Fiction bocce 19th-century engraving Italia Italy in the 19th century Bumble Puppy

14 notes

Plate from Giorgio Fossati (1705-78), Raccolta di varie favole : delineate, ed incise in rame / Recueil de diverses fables: designée & gravées George Fossati (Venezia: Carlo Pecora, 1744). I can never share enough images of animals from 18th-century books.
For more on animals and/or fables, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, free to read on the journal archive at Digital Commons:

Stories of COCKS and BULLS: The Ending of Tristram ShandyAuthor: Mark Loveridge
Real and Imaginary Stories: Robinson Crusoe and the Serious ReflectionsAuthor: Jeffrey Hopes
L’Orphelin de la famille: Le Paradigme de l’enfant/manuscrit trouvé dans le roman français du XVIII siècleAuthor: Jan Herman
De la Réalité au mythe: fantasme et fiction dans l’ “Histoire de Silvie” de Robert ChalleAuthor: Frédéric Deloffre
“Une fée moderne”: An Unpublished Fairy Tale by la Comtesse de MuratAuthor: Ellen Welch

Plate from Giorgio Fossati (1705-78), Raccolta di varie favole : delineate, ed incise in rame / Recueil de diverses fables: designée & gravées George Fossati (Venezia: Carlo Pecora, 1744). I can never share enough images of animals from 18th-century books.

For more on animals and/or fables, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, free to read on the journal archive at Digital Commons:

Filed under 18th-century fables 18th-century engravers 18th-century engraving Eighteenth-Century Fiction elephant rhinocerous fable

4 notes

Bonus post this week to celebrate two years on Tumblr for the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction, and gaining our 400th follower!
Fisher selling his catch to women on the beach in Italia: I adore the bright colours in their clothes. They look to be bargaining fiercely with the fisher. This plate is from James Godby, Italian Scenery: representing the manners, customs, and amusements of the different states of Itlay containing thirty-two coloured engravings (London: Edward Ormer, 1806).
Read the journal’s archives online for free at Digital Commons:
http://digitalcommons.mcmaster.ca/ecf/all_issues.html

Bonus post this week to celebrate two years on Tumblr for the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction, and gaining our 400th follower!

Fisher selling his catch to women on the beach in Italia: I adore the bright colours in their clothes. They look to be bargaining fiercely with the fisher. This plate is from James Godby, Italian Scenery: representing the manners, customs, and amusements of the different states of Itlay containing thirty-two coloured engravings (London: Edward Ormer, 1806).

Read the journal’s archives online for free at Digital Commons:

http://digitalcommons.mcmaster.ca/ecf/all_issues.html

Filed under 18th-Century Art 18th-century engravers Italia Eighteenth-Century Fiction

6 notes

Scottifying the Palate, from the Picturesque Beauties of Boswell series (1786). McMaster University owns a beautiful album holding this collection of etched plates by TThomas Rowlandson after Collings, which caricature James Boswell’s Journal of a Tour in the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson (London, 1785). “Dr Johnson is slumped on a quayside as he is reluctantly fed salted dry Speldings fish by a jocular Boswell who attempts to introduce Johnson to the Scottish palate. Boswell’s servant, Ritter, stands in the left background. On the right fish wives point and laugh at the spectacle.” The inscription included below the image (but not pictured here) quotes a passage from Boswell’s book: “I bought some Speldings, fish salted and dried in a particular manner, being dipped in the Sea & dried in the Sun and eaten by the Scots by way of relish, — He had never seen them though they are sold in London. I insisted on Scottifying his palate, but he was very reluctant. With difficulty I prevailed with him. — He did not like it.” I can understand how the caricuratist came up with this scene.
For more on the importance and ubiquity of caricature in 18th-century culture, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles (free to read on the journal’s Digital Commons archive):
Pamela, Shamela, and the Politics of the Pamela VogueAuthor: Richard Gooding
General Tilney and Tyranny: Northanger AbbeyAuthor: Shinobu Minma
Imitation and Ideology: Henry Mackenzie’s RousseauAuthor: Kim Ian Michasiw
"Falling into Fiction": Reading Female QuixotismAuthor: Stephen Carl Arch
The Critique of Freethinking from Swift to SterneAuthor: Martin C. Battestin
Parody in Eliza Haywood’s A Letter from H— G—g, Esq.Author: Earla A. Wilputte

Scottifying the Palate, from the Picturesque Beauties of Boswell series (1786). McMaster University owns a beautiful album holding this collection of etched plates by TThomas Rowlandson after Collings, which caricature James Boswell’s Journal of a Tour in the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson (London, 1785). “Dr Johnson is slumped on a quayside as he is reluctantly fed salted dry Speldings fish by a jocular Boswell who attempts to introduce Johnson to the Scottish palate. Boswell’s servant, Ritter, stands in the left background. On the right fish wives point and laugh at the spectacle.” The inscription included below the image (but not pictured here) quotes a passage from Boswell’s book: “I bought some Speldings, fish salted and dried in a particular manner, being dipped in the Sea & dried in the Sun and eaten by the Scots by way of relish, — He had never seen them though they are sold in London. I insisted on Scottifying his palate, but he was very reluctant. With difficulty I prevailed with him. — He did not like it.” I can understand how the caricuratist came up with this scene.

For more on the importance and ubiquity of caricature in 18th-century culture, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles (free to read on the journal’s Digital Commons archive):

Pamela, Shamela, and the Politics of the Pamela Vogue
Author: Richard Gooding

General Tilney and Tyranny: Northanger Abbey
Author: Shinobu Minma

Imitation and Ideology: Henry Mackenzie’s Rousseau
Author: Kim Ian Michasiw

"Falling into Fiction": Reading Female Quixotism
Author: Stephen Carl Arch

The Critique of Freethinking from Swift to Sterne
Author: Martin C. Battestin

Parody in Eliza Haywood’s A Letter from H— G—g, Esq.
Author: Earla A. Wilputte

Filed under 18th-century engraving Eighteenth-Century Fiction James Boswell Samuel Johnson Thomas Rowlandson Collings 18th-century engravers caricature

17 notes

That’s some rustic macaroni-eating. I found this color plate and the accompanying text in a book published in 1806. Another post from the long 18th century, but that’s where I find the most color options! The explanatory text made me laugh. I will post more of the fabulous color plates from this book this spring. James Godby, Italian Scenery: representing the manners, customs, and amusements of the different states of Itlay containing thirty-two coloured engravings (London: Edward Ormer, 1806).

For more on 18th-century gastronomy, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Feasting and Fasting: Nourishment in the Novels of Samuel Richardson
Author: Peter Sabor

Cooking Up a Story: Jane West, Prudentia Homespun, and the Consumption of Fiction
Author: David Thame

"Wholesome Nutriment" for the Rising Generation: Food, Nationalism, and Didactic Fiction at the End of the Eighteenth Century
Author: Lisa Wood

"The Muses O’lio”: Satire, Food, and Tobias Smollett’s The Expedition of Humphry Clinker
Author: Nicholas D. Smith

Filed under 18th-century food long eighteenth century Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century engraving Italy macaroni pasta food history

5 notes

Eighteenth-century books are known for their long titles, and this one is a doozy: The eight volumes of letters writ by a Turkish spy, who liv’d five and forty years undiscover’d at Paris Giving an Impartial Account to the Divan at Constantinople, of the most Remarkable Transactions of Europe: And, Discovering several Intrigues and Secrets of the Christian Courts (especially of That of France) Continued from the Year 1637, to the Year 1682. Written, originally, in Arabick. Translated into Italian, from thence into English: And Now Published with a Large Historical Preface and Index, to Illustrate the Whole. By the Translator of the First Volume. According to scholars, the first volume of “Letters Writ by a Turkish Spy” published in 1684 in Paris was the work of Giovanni Paolo Marana, 1642-93. This image is from a 1707-8 edition.
For more on 18th-century spies and espionage, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:
Is There a Turk in the Turkish Spy?Author: Virginia H. Aksan

Fatal Fluency: Behn’s Fiction and the Restoration LetterAuthor: Janet Todd

Cryptogrammatophoria: The Romance and Novelty of Losing Readers in CodeAuthor: Katherine Ellison
“A perfect Retreat indeed”: Speculation, Surveillance, and Space in Defoe’s RoxanaAuthor: Christina L. Healey
Trading Sex for Secrets in Haywood’s Love in ExcessAuthor: Scott Black

Eighteenth-century books are known for their long titles, and this one is a doozy: The eight volumes of letters writ by a Turkish spy, who liv’d five and forty years undiscover’d at Paris Giving an Impartial Account to the Divan at Constantinople, of the most Remarkable Transactions of Europe: And, Discovering several Intrigues and Secrets of the Christian Courts (especially of That of France) Continued from the Year 1637, to the Year 1682. Written, originally, in Arabick. Translated into Italian, from thence into English: And Now Published with a Large Historical Preface and Index, to Illustrate the Whole. By the Translator of the First Volume. According to scholars, the first volume of “Letters Writ by a Turkish Spy” published in 1684 in Paris was the work of Giovanni Paolo Marana, 1642-93. This image is from a 1707-8 edition.

For more on 18th-century spies and espionage, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Is There a Turk in the Turkish Spy?
Author: Virginia H. Aksan

Cryptogrammatophoria: The Romance and Novelty of Losing Readers in Code
Author: Katherine Ellison

A perfect Retreat indeed”: Speculation, Surveillance, and Space in Defoe’s Roxana
Author: Christina L. Healey

Trading Sex for Secrets in Haywood’s Love in Excess
Author: Scott Black

Filed under 18th-century espionage Eighteenth-Century Fiction Giovanni Paolo Marana Book titled Turkish Spy