Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

5 notes

Eighteenth-century books are known for their long titles, and this one is a doozy: The eight volumes of letters writ by a Turkish spy, who liv’d five and forty years undiscover’d at Paris Giving an Impartial Account to the Divan at Constantinople, of the most Remarkable Transactions of Europe: And, Discovering several Intrigues and Secrets of the Christian Courts (especially of That of France) Continued from the Year 1637, to the Year 1682. Written, originally, in Arabick. Translated into Italian, from thence into English: And Now Published with a Large Historical Preface and Index, to Illustrate the Whole. By the Translator of the First Volume. According to scholars, the first volume of “Letters Writ by a Turkish Spy” published in 1684 in Paris was the work of Giovanni Paolo Marana, 1642-93. This image is from a 1707-8 edition.
For more on 18th-century spies and espionage, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:
Is There a Turk in the Turkish Spy?Author: Virginia H. Aksan

Fatal Fluency: Behn’s Fiction and the Restoration LetterAuthor: Janet Todd

Cryptogrammatophoria: The Romance and Novelty of Losing Readers in CodeAuthor: Katherine Ellison
“A perfect Retreat indeed”: Speculation, Surveillance, and Space in Defoe’s RoxanaAuthor: Christina L. Healey
Trading Sex for Secrets in Haywood’s Love in ExcessAuthor: Scott Black

Eighteenth-century books are known for their long titles, and this one is a doozy: The eight volumes of letters writ by a Turkish spy, who liv’d five and forty years undiscover’d at Paris Giving an Impartial Account to the Divan at Constantinople, of the most Remarkable Transactions of Europe: And, Discovering several Intrigues and Secrets of the Christian Courts (especially of That of France) Continued from the Year 1637, to the Year 1682. Written, originally, in Arabick. Translated into Italian, from thence into English: And Now Published with a Large Historical Preface and Index, to Illustrate the Whole. By the Translator of the First Volume. According to scholars, the first volume of “Letters Writ by a Turkish Spy” published in 1684 in Paris was the work of Giovanni Paolo Marana, 1642-93. This image is from a 1707-8 edition.

For more on 18th-century spies and espionage, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Is There a Turk in the Turkish Spy?
Author: Virginia H. Aksan

Cryptogrammatophoria: The Romance and Novelty of Losing Readers in Code
Author: Katherine Ellison

A perfect Retreat indeed”: Speculation, Surveillance, and Space in Defoe’s Roxana
Author: Christina L. Healey

Trading Sex for Secrets in Haywood’s Love in Excess
Author: Scott Black

Filed under 18th-century espionage Eighteenth-Century Fiction Giovanni Paolo Marana Book titled Turkish Spy

37 notes

The ever-changing and ever-challenging urban landscape: this engraving records the designs of the London city gates, most of which were destroyed in the 18th and 19th centuries. Several of these gates stood for hundreds of years prior to the modern road-widening schemes that ensured their destruction.
For more on 18th-century urban architecture and its impact on the city denizens, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

There and Back Again: The Country and the City in the Fiction of Rétif de la BretonneAuthor: Peter Wagstaff

Details of Space: Narrative Description in Early Eighteenth-Century NovelsAuthor: Cynthia Wall
Relocating Femininity: Women and the City in Mary Brunton’s FictionAuthor: Martha Musgrove

The Literary History of the Sash WindowAuthor: Rachel Ramsey


Hygienic Motherhood: Domestic Medicine and Eliza Fenwick’s SecresyAuthor: Mercy Cannon


Interiors and Interiority in the Ornamental DairyAuthor: Meredith Martin


Mourning and Material Culture in Eliza Haywood’s The History of Miss Betsy ThoughtlessAuthor: Kelly McGuire

'The Tinsel of the Times': Smollett's Argument against Conspicuous Consumption in Humphry ClinkerAuthor: Susan L. Jacobsen

The ever-changing and ever-challenging urban landscape: this engraving records the designs of the London city gates, most of which were destroyed in the 18th and 19th centuries. Several of these gates stood for hundreds of years prior to the modern road-widening schemes that ensured their destruction.

For more on 18th-century urban architecture and its impact on the city denizens, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Details of Space: Narrative Description in Early Eighteenth-Century Novels
Author: Cynthia Wall

Relocating Femininity: Women and the City in Mary Brunton’s Fiction
Author: Martha Musgrove

'The Tinsel of the Times': Smollett's Argument against Conspicuous Consumption in Humphry Clinker
Author: Susan L. Jacobsen

Filed under London 18th-century engraving London gates London city gates 18th-century architecture 18th-century urban life Eighteenth-Century Fiction urban life urban City of London

6 notes

mimic-of-modes:

A silver Candlestick, with girandoles, with two arms; it is in the newest taste; it is extremely rich in chasing and engraving.This Candlestick is the work of M. Bouty, Merchant Silversmith, that we have already introduced. - Cabinet des Modes, 11e Cahier, 3e Planche

The 18th-century engravings showing designs and architecture are so detailed and intricate. Beautiful, and at the same time the design books remind me a bit of the Sears catalog.

mimic-of-modes:

A silver Candlestick, with girandoles, with two arms; it is in the newest taste; it is extremely rich in chasing and engraving.

This Candlestick is the work of M. Bouty, Merchant Silversmith, that we have already introduced. - Cabinet des Modes, 11e Cahier, 3e Planche

The 18th-century engravings showing designs and architecture are so detailed and intricate. Beautiful, and at the same time the design books remind me a bit of the Sears catalog.

Filed under 18th-century design 18th-century engraving interior design 18th-century interior design

8 notes

Cutaway view of 18th-century architecture: “Section of Wansted House,” from the book Colen Campbell, Vitruvius Britannicus: or, the British architect. Containing the geometrical plans of the most considerable gardens and plantations; also the plans, elevations and sections of the most regular buildings, not published in the first and second volumes. With large views in perspective, of the most remarkable edifies in Great Britain. Engraven by the best hands in one hundred large folio plates (London: Joseph Smith, 1725). This book is enormous, so the photo gets a little wobbly around the edges, owing to the binding and not being able to hold the camera far enough away from the page.
For more on 18th-century architecture, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Sterne, Sebald, and Siege ArchitectureAuthor: Jonathan Lamb


The Architectural Design of Beckford’s VathekAuthor: Sandro Jung


`Ce lieu au délices’: Art and Imitation in the French Libertine CabinetAuthor: Paul J. Young


The Literary History of the Sash WindowAuthor: Rachel Ramsey


Gothic Origins: New Primary ScholarshipAuthor: Michael Gamer


Interiors and Interiority in the Ornamental DairyAuthor: Meredith Martin

Gendering Rooms: Domestic Architecture and Literary ActsAuthor: Cynthia Wall

Cutaway view of 18th-century architecture: “Section of Wansted House,” from the book Colen Campbell, Vitruvius Britannicus: or, the British architect. Containing the geometrical plans of the most considerable gardens and plantations; also the plans, elevations and sections of the most regular buildings, not published in the first and second volumes. With large views in perspective, of the most remarkable edifies in Great Britain. Engraven by the best hands in one hundred large folio plates (London: Joseph Smith, 1725). This book is enormous, so the photo gets a little wobbly around the edges, owing to the binding and not being able to hold the camera far enough away from the page.

For more on 18th-century architecture, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Gendering Rooms: Domestic Architecture and Literary Acts
Author: Cynthia Wall

Filed under 18th-century architecture Eighteenth-Century Fiction Wansted House 18th-century engraving

7 notes

This image comes from an llustrated version of the really sad poem by Thomas Gray, “Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes” (1748). If you want to read the entire poem, see http://www.potw.org/archive/potw90.html. The ode ends with a line sampled from Shakespeare, as many of his fans were wont to do in the 18th century.
For more on sampling, editing, forging, and other forms of “appreciation” in the 18th century, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, which are free to read on the journal’s archive.

The Culture of Newtonianism and Shakespeare’s Editors: from Pope to JohnsonAuthor: Gefen Bar-On Santor

Forging a Romantic Identity: Herbert Croft’s Love and Madness and W.H. Ireland’s Shakespeare MSAuthor: Robert Miles

Publicity, Privacy, and the Power of Fiction in the Gunning LettersAuthor: Thomas O. Beebee

Fact, Fiction, and Anonymity: Reading Love and Madness: A Story Too True (1780)Author: Robert J. Griffin
La Place’s Histoire de Tom Jones, ou l’enfant trouvé and CandideAuthor: E.M. Langille
True Crime: Contagion, Print Culture, and Herbert Croft’s Love and Madness; or, A Story Too TrueAuthor: Kelly Ann McGuire

This image comes from an llustrated version of the really sad poem by Thomas Gray, “Ode on the Death of a Favourite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes” (1748). If you want to read the entire poem, see http://www.potw.org/archive/potw90.html. The ode ends with a line sampled from Shakespeare, as many of his fans were wont to do in the 18th century.

For more on sampling, editing, forging, and other forms of “appreciation” in the 18th century, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, which are free to read on the journal’s archive.

Forging a Romantic Identity: Herbert Croft’s Love and Madness and W.H. Ireland’s Shakespeare MS
Author: Robert Miles

Fact, Fiction, and Anonymity: Reading Love and Madness: A Story Too True (1780)
Author: Robert J. Griffin

La Place’s Histoire de Tom Jones, ou l’enfant trouvé and Candide
Author: E.M. Langille

True Crime: Contagion, Print Culture, and Herbert Croft’s Love and Madness; or, A Story Too True
Author: Kelly Ann McGuire

Filed under odes Thomas Gray Favourite Cat 18th-century poetry 18th-century engraving Eighteenth-Century Fiction

27 notes

More ruins! This book is very large in size, not just page number, and also has a tight binding, so sometimes photographing the engravings is a challenge. I left these “au naturel” so you could see the lighting issues I have to deal with in the basement archives. From the book Henry Boswell, Historical descriptions of new and elegant picturesque views of the antiquities of England and Wales: being a grand copper-plate repository of elegance, taste, and entertainment. Containing a new and complete collection of superb views of all the most remarkable ruins and antient buildings, such as abbeys, castles, monasteries, priories…(London: Alex. Hogg, 1786).

For more on antiquities in 18th-century Britain, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

`The Little Republic’ of the Family: Goldsmith’s Politics of Nostalgia
Author: James P. Carson
Publication: Eighteenth-Century Fiction

Filed under ruins Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th Century 18th century history history

7 notes

Undersea life from 18th-century exploration books, mainly fishes. I think that “toad fish” looks more like a porcupine puffer than what is today called a toad-fish, and the cuckold-fish is likely the horned trunkfish (aka cowfish).

Can’t come up with a good segue to some Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, so will just post the results of a random search in the Digital Commons archive: searched “pirate.”

Penelope Aubin and Narratives of Empire
Author: Edward J. Kozaczka

Filed under Eighteenth-Century Fiction pirates fish 18th-century engraving

8 notes

Birds, birds, birds! I just cannot get enough of illustrations of our avian friends, or as one engraving calls them as a group, “Volatiles.” These scientific engravings come from various 18th-century books documenting exploratory voyages around the world.

Read more about exploration in the 18th century in these Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

The Exchanged Portrait and the Lethal Picture: Visualization Techniques and Native Knowledge in Samuel Hearne’s Sketches from His Trek to the Arctic Ocean and John Webber’s Record of the Northern Pacific
Author: Philippe Despoix

`Recollection … sets my busy imagination to work’: Transatlantic Self-Narration, Performance, and Reception in The Female American
Author: Kristianne Kalata Vaccaro

Le Voyage abymé: texte et contextes du ‘Voyageur dans le Nouveau Monde’ de Marivaux
Author: Catherine Gallouët-Schutter

Jacques Grasset de Saint-Sauveur et les costumes des «Sauvages du Canada»
Author: Chantal Turbide

Thalassophobia and Geolatry: Bernardin de Saint-Pierre and the Geography of Virtue
Author: Ziad Elmarsafy

Defoe’s ‘South-Sea’ and ‘North-Sea’ Schemes: A Footnote to A New Voyage Round the World
Authors: P.N. Furbank, W.R. Owens

Filed under birds in art 18th-Century Art 18th-century engraving birds Eighteenth-Century Fiction