Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

212 notes

books0977:

Charles Towneley in his Sculpture Gallery (1782). Johann Zoffany (German, 1733-1810). Oil on canvas. Art Gallery and Museum, Burnley.
Towneley (1737-1805) was a famous collector of finds from ancient excavation sites. Zoffany portrayed him in his library with an imaginary assembly of the entire collection. He is shown with three friends: Charles Greville, a politician, Thomas Astle, conservator of the British Museum, and Pierre d’Hancarville, French antiquarian. Towneley and d’Hancarville are seated with books in Baroque armchairs.

Zoffany!

books0977:

Charles Towneley in his Sculpture Gallery (1782). Johann Zoffany (German, 1733-1810). Oil on canvas. Art Gallery and Museum, Burnley.

Towneley (1737-1805) was a famous collector of finds from ancient excavation sites. Zoffany portrayed him in his library with an imaginary assembly of the entire collection. He is shown with three friends: Charles Greville, a politician, Thomas Astle, conservator of the British Museum, and Pierre d’Hancarville, French antiquarian. Towneley and d’Hancarville are seated with books in Baroque armchairs.

Zoffany!

Filed under 18th-Century Art zoffany

93 notes

a-l-ancien-regime:

Johan Zoffany, “The Sharp Family,” 1779–81, oil on canvas
The Sharp Family, afloat on a barge called Apollo with Fulham Old Church in the distance, is so exuberant as to be barely credible. It is a pyramid, a heap of humanity, each subject beautifully and elaborately dressed and exhibiting a solemn concentration on the music to come. Horns, harpsichord and cello are all at hand ready to be brought into play, and the scene is further enlivened by a baby holding a remarkably calm kitten.
Zoffany excelled at the group portrait, the conversation piece. 
By Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London, and the Lloyd-Baker Trustees

And even more Zoffany!

a-l-ancien-regime:

Johan Zoffany, “The Sharp Family,” 1779–81, oil on canvas

The Sharp Family, afloat on a barge called Apollo with Fulham Old Church in the distance, is so exuberant as to be barely credible. It is a pyramid, a heap of humanity, each subject beautifully and elaborately dressed and exhibiting a solemn concentration on the music to come. Horns, harpsichord and cello are all at hand ready to be brought into play, and the scene is further enlivened by a baby holding a remarkably calm kitten.

Zoffany excelled at the group portrait, the conversation piece. 

By Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London, and the Lloyd-Baker Trustees

And even more Zoffany!

Filed under 18th-Century Art zoffany

2 notes

Anonymous asked: Hello! I'm publishing a book called "Surprise: The Poetics of the Unexpected from Milton to Austen" (forthcoming from Cornell in 2015). I was intrigued by the Rowlandson illustrations of Joseph Andrews, because I'm looking for an iconic representation of surprise. Do you have any other images from the novel that you could share? I'm particularly interested in finding the scene in which Lady Booby is "surprised" by Joseph in her bedroom. -Christopher R. Miller, Coll. of Staten Island-CUNY

Please email me at ecf@mcmaster.ca and I can send you the higher resolution file of that Lady Booby image, a resolution suitable for printing, because we have printed it before as the cover of this issue: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/toc/ecf.22.3.html Click on the cover image on this page to see a larger version. Is this the image you’re interested in? The dumping scene is a good one for surprise too. Just email me, and I’ll send you the files for these public domain images.

18 notes

lindahall:

Pierre Sonnerat - Scientist of the Day

Pierre Sonnerat, a French explorer and naturalist, was born Aug. 18, 1748. Between 1769 and 1772, Sonnerat made a voyage to Madagascar, the Seychelles, the Philippines, and New Guinea, discovering many new plants, birds, and mammals during his travels. He is best noted for his discovery and naming of a large lemur in Madagascar. A native pointed the animal out to Sonnerat and said “Indri”, or “look there” in the local dialect. Sonnerat thought he was being provided with the animal’s local name, and called it an Indri. And Indri it remains today—in fact, Linnaean style, it is Indri indri, doubly compounding the misdemeanor.

Sonnerat published a sumptuous narrative of his travels, Voyage ą la Nouvelle-Guinée (1776), which we have in the History of Science Collection at the Library. It is illustrated with 120 full-page engravings based on drawings that Sonnerat did himself. So we see above a King bird of paradise from New Guinea, a Coco-de-mer palm from the Seychelles, and a Chinese junk that he encountered somewhere in the Indian Ocean. The book contains no image, alas, of the charming indri.

The frontispiece, the last image above, depicts Sonnerat sketching in the field, fanned by natives wielding palm-fronds. It is not exactly a politically-correct illustration these days, with its suggestion of European supremacy, but it is a pretty accurate portrayal, not only of Sonnerat, but of eighteenth-century European colonial attitudes toward native peoples.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Filed under 18th-century engraving

34 notes

The whole picture: I cropped this image a little for the cover of the new special issue of the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction: “The Senses of Humour/Les Sens de l’humour,” so I thought I should share the entire engraving here on Tumblr.
Read this special issue and other numbers of Eighteenth-Century Fiction online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE:http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/toc/ecf.26.4.html

The whole picture: I cropped this image a little for the cover of the new special issue of the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction: “The Senses of Humour/Les Sens de l’humour,” so I thought I should share the entire engraving here on Tumblr.

Read this special issue and other numbers of Eighteenth-Century Fiction online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE:
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/toc/ecf.26.4.html

Filed under 18th-century engraving william hogarth Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century theatre 18th-century humor