Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

18 notes

Another from the long eighteenth century: “The Death of Nelson,” which occurred at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, portrayed in this engraving from the 1817 book Christopher Kelly, History of the French revolution: and of the wars produced by that memorable event, from the commencement of hostilities in 1792, to the second restoration of hostilities in 1792, to the second restoration of Louis XVIII and the deportation of Napoleon Buonaparte to the island of St. Helena: including a complete account of the war between Great-Britain and America and the memorable battle of Waterloo: to which are appended biographical sketches of the heroes of Waterloo, and other distinguished public characters (London, 1817). Gotta love those long, descriptive titles! In this image, if you squint at the top left, you can see through the smoke of battle the gunman who fired the killing shot hanging out of his ship’s fighting tops.
To read more about the impact that the Napoleonic wars had on Europe and its literature, please see the followingEighteenth-Century Fictionarticles at the free-to-read McMaster University archives on Digital Commons:

"Domestic Virtues and National Importance": Lord Nelson, Captain Wentworth, and the English Napoleonic War HeroAuthor: Jocelyn Harris
Transcendental Soldiers: Warfare in Schiller’s Wallenstein and Die Jungfrau von OrleansAuthor: Elisabeth Krimmer


The Silence of Miss Lambe: Sanditon and Fictions of ‘Race’ in the Abolition EraAuthor: Sara Salih
Maria Edgeworth’s Déjà-Voodoo: Interior Decoration, Retroactivity, and Colonial Allegory in ‘The AbsenteeAuthor: Clara Tuite

Another from the long eighteenth century: “The Death of Nelson,” which occurred at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, portrayed in this engraving from the 1817 book Christopher Kelly, History of the French revolution: and of the wars produced by that memorable event, from the commencement of hostilities in 1792, to the second restoration of hostilities in 1792, to the second restoration of Louis XVIII and the deportation of Napoleon Buonaparte to the island of St. Helena: including a complete account of the war between Great-Britain and America and the memorable battle of Waterloo: to which are appended biographical sketches of the heroes of Waterloo, and other distinguished public characters (London, 1817). Gotta love those long, descriptive titles! In this image, if you squint at the top left, you can see through the smoke of battle the gunman who fired the killing shot hanging out of his ship’s fighting tops.

To read more about the impact that the Napoleonic wars had on Europe and its literature, please see the followingEighteenth-Century Fictionarticles at the free-to-read McMaster University archives on Digital Commons:


Filed under 18th century 18th-century literature wars Admiral Nelson eighteenth century Eighteenth-Century Fiction

  1. s-hjames reblogged this from eighteenthcenturyfiction
  2. iseeacityburning reblogged this from 18thcenturylove
  3. concertinacheatingheartbeat reblogged this from 18thcenturylove and added:
    Am I the only thinking up captions for this man’s expression? His face is all just ‘I aint even mad’, NO ONE makes that...
  4. shipsshipships reblogged this from 18thcenturylove
  5. 18thcenturylove reblogged this from eighteenthcenturyfiction
  6. celiashits reblogged this from eighteenthcenturyfiction and added:
    JENNA J SEAL OF APPROVAL came out of the dullest class ever and saw this. THIS is how you do the eighteenth century...
  7. vfreie reblogged this from eighteenthcenturyfiction
  8. eighteenthcenturyfiction posted this