Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

8 notes

Scottifying the Palate, from the Picturesque Beauties of Boswell series (1786). McMaster University owns a beautiful album holding this collection of etched plates by Thomas Rowlandson after Collings, which caricature James Boswell’s Journal of a Tour in the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson (London, 1785). “Dr Johnson is slumped on a quayside as he is reluctantly fed salted dry Speldings fish by a jocular Boswell who attempts to introduce Johnson to the Scottish palate. Boswell’s servant, Ritter, stands in the left background. On the right fish wives point and laugh at the spectacle.” The inscription included below the image (but not pictured here) quotes a passage from Boswell’s book: “I bought some Speldings, fish salted and dried in a particular manner, being dipped in the Sea & dried in the Sun and eaten by the Scots by way of relish, — He had never seen them though they are sold in London. I insisted on Scottifying his palate, but he was very reluctant. With difficulty I prevailed with him. — He did not like it.” I can understand how the caricuratist came up with this scene.
For more on the importance and ubiquity of caricature in 18th-century culture, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Scottifying the Palate, from the Picturesque Beauties of Boswell series (1786). McMaster University owns a beautiful album holding this collection of etched plates by Thomas Rowlandson after Collings, which caricature James Boswell’s Journal of a Tour in the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson (London, 1785). “Dr Johnson is slumped on a quayside as he is reluctantly fed salted dry Speldings fish by a jocular Boswell who attempts to introduce Johnson to the Scottish palate. Boswell’s servant, Ritter, stands in the left background. On the right fish wives point and laugh at the spectacle.” The inscription included below the image (but not pictured here) quotes a passage from Boswell’s book: “I bought some Speldings, fish salted and dried in a particular manner, being dipped in the Sea & dried in the Sun and eaten by the Scots by way of relish, — He had never seen them though they are sold in London. I insisted on Scottifying his palate, but he was very reluctant. With difficulty I prevailed with him. — He did not like it.” I can understand how the caricuratist came up with this scene.

For more on the importance and ubiquity of caricature in 18th-century culture, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under 18th-century engraving Eighteenth-Century Fiction James Boswell Samuel Johnson Thomas Rowlandson Collings 18th-century engravers caricature

  1. peteseeger reblogged this from eighteenthcenturyfiction
  2. ladycashasatiger reblogged this from eighteenthcenturyfiction
  3. eighteenthcenturyfiction posted this