Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

Posts tagged 18th century

27 notes

More ruins! This book is very large in size, not just page number, and also has a tight binding, so sometimes photographing the engravings is a challenge. I left these “au naturel” so you could see the lighting issues I have to deal with in the basement archives. From the book Henry Boswell, Historical descriptions of new and elegant picturesque views of the antiquities of England and Wales: being a grand copper-plate repository of elegance, taste, and entertainment. Containing a new and complete collection of superb views of all the most remarkable ruins and antient buildings, such as abbeys, castles, monasteries, priories…(London: Alex. Hogg, 1786).

For more on antiquities in 18th-century Britain, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

`The Little Republic’ of the Family: Goldsmith’s Politics of Nostalgia
Author: James P. Carson
Publication: Eighteenth-Century Fiction

Filed under ruins Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th Century 18th century history history

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Experiments with water, aka “Hydraulic Engines,” from William Henry Hall (d. 1807), The new royal encyclopædia; or, Complete modern universal dictionary of arts and sciences, on a new and improved plan, In which all the respective sciences, are arranged into complete systems, and the arts digested into distinct treatises (London: C. Cooke, [1788]). This book is so enormous that it is difficult to take photos of full pages in the dark archives. I hope you can see the diving bell and the fire engine and the intricate fountains.
For more on science in the 18th century, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal articles:

Gilles Auguste Bazin’s ‘True Novel’ of Natural HistoryAuthor: Marc Olivier


The Culture of Newtonianism and Shakespeare’s Editors: from Pope to JohnsonAuthor: Gefen Bar-On Santor


Letters of Recommendation and False Vizors: Physiognomy in the Novels of Henry FieldingAuthor: Graeme Tytler


Biography as Autopsy in William Godwin’s Memoirs of the Author of ‘A Vindication of the Rights of Woman’Author: Angela Monsam


Robert Boyle and the Epistemology of the NovelAuthor: J. Paul Hunter

Le Sort de Galilée: Paul et Virginie et la théorie des marées de Bernardin de Saint-PierreAuthor: Joël Castonguay-Bélanger

Experiments with water, aka “Hydraulic Engines,” from William Henry Hall (d. 1807), The new royal encyclopædia; or, Complete modern universal dictionary of arts and sciences, on a new and improved plan, In which all the respective sciences, are arranged into complete systems, and the arts digested into distinct treatises (London: C. Cooke, [1788]). This book is so enormous that it is difficult to take photos of full pages in the dark archives. I hope you can see the diving bell and the fire engine and the intricate fountains.

For more on science in the 18th century, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal articles:

Le Sort de Galilée: Paul et Virginie et la théorie des marées de Bernardin de Saint-Pierre
Author: Joël Castonguay-Bélanger

Filed under 18th-century engraving science 18th-century science water fountains diving bell 18th Century Eighteenth-Century Fiction

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During the great deep freeze of 1739-40, people set up a carnival-like gathering on the completely frozen River Thames. The Frost Fair was memorialized by printing presses brought right onto the ice. Amazing that this broadside survived all these years (and winters!). Frost Fairs were only accomplished when the Thames froze completely, so it was rather an unusual event for the merchants and attendees to transact their business on the ice.
For more on urban living in the 18th century, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles: free to read on the journal’s Digital Commons archive

Relocating Femininity: Women and the City in Mary Brunton’s FictionAuthor: Martha Musgrove


Defoe and the London Wall: Mapped PerspectivesAuthor: Edward Copeland

There and Back Again: The Country and the City in the Fiction of Rétif de la BretonneAuthor: Peter Wagstaff
‘A perfect Retreat indeed’: Speculation, Surveillance, and Space in Defoe’s RoxanaAuthor: Christina L. Healey

During the great deep freeze of 1739-40, people set up a carnival-like gathering on the completely frozen River Thames. The Frost Fair was memorialized by printing presses brought right onto the ice. Amazing that this broadside survived all these years (and winters!). Frost Fairs were only accomplished when the Thames froze completely, so it was rather an unusual event for the merchants and attendees to transact their business on the ice.

For more on urban living in the 18th century, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles: free to read on the journal’s Digital Commons archive

There and Back Again: The Country and the City in the Fiction of Rétif de la Bretonne
Author: Peter Wagstaff

A perfect Retreat indeed’: Speculation, Surveillance, and Space in Defoe’s Roxana
Author: Christina L. Healey

Filed under river thames Frost Fair 18th Century Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century engraving 18th-century broadside urban life city living 18th-century urban life

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I always get a good response here on Tumblr when I post printers’ ornaments, so here are three more that I found recently while searching for scientific illustrations. These ornaments are from Antoine-Yves Goguet (1716-58), De l’origine des loix, des arts, et des sciences: et de leurs progrès chez les anciens peuples (Paris: Desaint & Saillant, 1758), vol. 2. Gotta love the bow-wielding putti in the first one: they look dangerous!

To learn more about print culture in the 18th century, please read (free to read on the archive!) the following special issue of the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction:

Volume 14, Issue 3 (2002) “Fiction and Print Culture / Genre romanesque et culture de l’imprimé

Filed under print culture printers' ornaments 18th-century engraving Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th Century

6 notes

Portrait of Confucious, frontispiece to vol. 1 of J.-B. Du Halde (1674-1743), The General History of China: containing a geographical, historical, chronological, political and physical description of the empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet; including an exact and particular account of their customs, manners, ceremonies, religion, arts and sciences; the whole adorn’d with curious maps, and variety of copper-plates (London: J. Watts, 1741), 3rd ed. corr.
I really cannot get enough of 18th-century travel literature, in case you haven’t already noticed. The engravings in so many of these large format travel books are positively magnificent.
For more travel literature of the 18th century, and how various cultures around the world influenced each other in that era of circumnavigation, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles for free at the journal archive:
Crossing Borders with Mademoiselle de Richelieu: Fiction, Gender, and the Problem of AuthenticityAuthor: Carolyn Woodward
Filming Tourism, Portraying PemberleyAuthor: Linda V. Troost
Simon Berington’s Adventures of Sig’r Gaudentio di LuccaAuthors: A.D. Harvey, Jean-Michel Racault
Consuming Indians: Tsonnonthouan, Colonialism, and the Commodification of CultureAuthor: Robbie J. Richardson
Female Favouritism, Orientalism, and the Bathing Closet in Memoirs of Count GrammontAuthor: Danielle Bobker

Portrait of Confucious, frontispiece to vol. 1 of J.-B. Du Halde (1674-1743), The General History of China: containing a geographical, historical, chronological, political and physical description of the empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet; including an exact and particular account of their customs, manners, ceremonies, religion, arts and sciences; the whole adorn’d with curious maps, and variety of copper-plates (London: J. Watts, 1741), 3rd ed. corr.

I really cannot get enough of 18th-century travel literature, in case you haven’t already noticed. The engravings in so many of these large format travel books are positively magnificent.

For more travel literature of the 18th century, and how various cultures around the world influenced each other in that era of circumnavigation, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles for free at the journal archive:

Crossing Borders with Mademoiselle de Richelieu: Fiction, Gender, and the Problem of Authenticity
Author: Carolyn Woodward

Filming Tourism, Portraying Pemberley
Author: Linda V. Troost

Simon Berington’s Adventures of Sig’r Gaudentio di Lucca
Authors: A.D. Harvey, Jean-Michel Racault

Consuming Indians: Tsonnonthouan, Colonialism, and the Commodification of Culture
Author: Robbie J. Richardson

Female Favouritism, Orientalism, and the Bathing Closet in Memoirs of Count Grammont
Author: Danielle Bobker

Filed under 18th Century 18th century history history travel writing confucius China Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century engraving

20 notes

Animal symbols for abstract concepts, or “Hieroglyphics” as the title of this page reads: calumny, vigilance, sagacity, housewifry (… what?). I am really sharing this image for the merhorse, center right of this illustration detail from Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745).
To read more about symbolism in 18th-century literature, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, free to read at the journal’s archive:

The Crocodile Strikes Back: Saint Martin’s Interpretation of the French RevolutionAuthor: Fabienne Moore

Female Favouritism, Orientalism, and the Bathing Closet in Memoirs of Count GrammontAuthor: Danielle Bobker

The Myth of Cronus: Cannibal and Sign in Robinson CrusoeAuthor: Dianne Armstrong

'The setting always casts a different shade on it': Allusion and Interpretation in Sense and SensibilityAuthor: Mark Blackwell
Classical Myth in Richardson’s Clarissa: Ovid RevisedAuthor: Douglas Murray

Animal symbols for abstract concepts, or “Hieroglyphics” as the title of this page reads: calumny, vigilance, sagacity, housewifry (… what?). I am really sharing this image for the merhorse, center right of this illustration detail from Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745).

To read more about symbolism in 18th-century literature, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, free to read at the journal’s archive:

Female Favouritism, Orientalism, and the Bathing Closet in Memoirs of Count Grammont
Author: Danielle Bobker

'The setting always casts a different shade on it': Allusion and Interpretation in Sense and Sensibility
Author: Mark Blackwell

Classical Myth in Richardson’s Clarissa: Ovid Revised
Author: Douglas Murray

Filed under 18th-century engraving Eighteenth-Century Fiction hieroglyphics symbolism animals merhorse calumny 18th century

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A detail (!) from a plate that I’m using for the cover of the autumn issue of Eighteenth-Century Fiction (26.1). This book is enormous in page length and in physical size: Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745), vol. 1. I had to stand on tiptoe to photograph this engraving, and even then I had to take 4 photos to cover the entire illustration. This engraving purports to show people practising all of the branches of science (and the arts!): included in this slice are anatomy (A, near the skeleton on the left), medicine (B, in the middle, one-third down from the top), and chemistry (N, bottom left).
Read more about science in the 18th century in the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, which are free to read on the Digital Commons archive:

Gilles Auguste Bazin’s ‘True Novel’ of Natural HistoryAuthor: Marc Olivier


The Culture of Newtonianism and Shakespeare’s Editors: from Pope to JohnsonAuthor: Gefen Bar-On Santor

Letters of Recommendation and False Vizors: Physiognomy in the Novels of Henry FieldingAuthor: Graeme Tytler
The Hidden Life of Porcelainiers in Eighteenth-Century FranceAuthor: Christine A. Jones

A detail (!) from a plate that I’m using for the cover of the autumn issue of Eighteenth-Century Fiction (26.1). This book is enormous in page length and in physical size: Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745), vol. 1. I had to stand on tiptoe to photograph this engraving, and even then I had to take 4 photos to cover the entire illustration. This engraving purports to show people practising all of the branches of science (and the arts!): included in this slice are anatomy (A, near the skeleton on the left), medicine (B, in the middle, one-third down from the top), and chemistry (N, bottom left).

Read more about science in the 18th century in the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, which are free to read on the Digital Commons archive:

Letters of Recommendation and False Vizors: Physiognomy in the Novels of Henry Fielding
Author: Graeme Tytler

The Hidden Life of Porcelainiers in Eighteenth-Century France
Author: Christine A. Jones

Filed under 18th Century 18th-century science 18th-Century Art engravings 18th-century engraving book illustration

53 notes

This book reminds me of how much fun I used to have reading through encyclopedias and illustrated dictionaries when I was a child: yes, I was that kid. The illustrations of various trades and occupations are remarkably detailed for their small size and woodcut print technology.

To learn more about 18th-century trades, see the special issue of the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction entitled "Trades/Le Négoce."

Filed under eighteenth+century trades eighteenth-century fiction rope maker glass blower occupations jobs 18th Century 18th century history 18th-century engraving

22 notes

Three scenes from Le Sopha, conte moral (1742), by Claude Prosper Jolyot de Crébillon (1707-77). These engravings are from the 1749 edition, engr. P. Calavreau. This satirical reincarnation tale is told by a young courtier, whose cursed soul is reborn in a series of sofas. The narrator of this libertine novel cannot be reincarnated into a human body until two virginal lovers consummate their relationship on him.

For more on 18th-century French libertine literature (libertinage), see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Le Voyage sadien en Italie: la Révolution française comme politique libertine dans l’Histoire de Juliette
Author: Mladen Kozul

Mais ou est le cul?” Life and Form in Sade’s Les Infortunes de la vertu and La Nouvelle Justine
Author: Olivier M. Delers

Poétique des ruines: le délabrement du roman dans Les Lettres athéniennes de Crébillon
Author: Dominique Hölzle

Le Clergé et l’inceste spirituel dans trois romans du XVIIIe siècle: Le Portier des Chartreux, Thérèse philosophe et Margot la ravaudeuse
Author: Jacqueline Chammas

Filed under 18th Century Eighteenth-Century Fiction eighteenth century libertinism Le Sopha Crebillon French literature

5 notes

The beaver, the national animal of Canada, is mentioned in a few Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles! I am uncertain about the scientific accuracy of the number of beavers working on the “village” in the bottom picture of this engraving. One seems to be carrying several small logs on its shoulder while trudging up the embankment! (What?!). Fun fact about beavers: their legendary swimming prowess includes the ability to stay underwater for 15 minutes! This engraving is from [Goadby, Robert, 1721-1778], Universe displayed; or, A survey of the wonderful works of creation, and of the various customs and inventions of men. In which whatever is most remarkable throughout the world, both with respect to the works of nature in plants, insects, serpents, beasts, birds, fishes, &c., and to the different customs, habits, inventions, and works of men, will not only be given an account of, but the most curious of them also finely represented by beautiful copper-plate cuts (London: W. Owen and R. Goadby, 1763), vol. 1, opp. p. 8.
Read the articles that mention the word “beaver” for free on the journal archive:

The Failure of Trade’s Empire in The History of Emily MontagueAuthor: Katherine Binhammer


Rags of Immortality: Clarissas Clothing and the Exchange of Second-Hand GoodsAuthor: Irene Fizer


Social Rank, ‘The Rise of the Novel,’ and Whig Histories of Eighteenth-Century FictionAuthor: Nicholas Hudson

`No place where women are of such importance’: Female Friendship, Empire, and Utopia in The History of Emily MontagueAuthor: Jodi L. Wyett

The beaver, the national animal of Canada, is mentioned in a few Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles! I am uncertain about the scientific accuracy of the number of beavers working on the “village” in the bottom picture of this engraving. One seems to be carrying several small logs on its shoulder while trudging up the embankment! (What?!). Fun fact about beavers: their legendary swimming prowess includes the ability to stay underwater for 15 minutes! This engraving is from [Goadby, Robert, 1721-1778], Universe displayed; or, A survey of the wonderful works of creation, and of the various customs and inventions of men. In which whatever is most remarkable throughout the world, both with respect to the works of nature in plants, insects, serpents, beasts, birds, fishes, &c., and to the different customs, habits, inventions, and works of men, will not only be given an account of, but the most curious of them also finely represented by beautiful copper-plate cuts (London: W. Owen and R. Goadby, 1763), vol. 1, opp. p. 8.

Read the articles that mention the word “beaver” for free on the journal archive:

`No place where women are of such importance’: Female Friendship, Empire, and Utopia in The History of Emily Montague
Author: Jodi L. Wyett

Filed under beaver north american trade 18th-century engraving Universe Display'd wildlife fur trade animals Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th century

42 notes

A young woman learns about generating electricity in this engraving entitled “A New Electrical Machine for the Table,” from Benjamin Martin (1705-82), The Young Gentleman and Lady’s Philosophy, in a continued survey of the works of nature and art; by way of dialogue. … Illustrated by … copper-plates. The second edition corrected, vol. 1 (London: W. Owen, 1772). I love how science and philosophy were all mixed together in this period, with practitioners called “philosophers” well into the nineteenth century, when the term “scientist” was coined and brought into general usage.
For more about women and science/philosophy in the 18th century, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:
Gilles Auguste Bazin’s ‘True Novel’ of Natural HistoryAuthor: Marc Olivier
The Extraordinary Ordinary Belinda: Maria Edgeworth’s Female PhilosopherAuthor: Deborah Weiss
Identifying Foreign Bodies: New Philosophers and Hottentots in Elizabeth Hamilton’s Memoirs of Modern PhilosophersAuthor: Claire Grogan
Histories of Female Progress in Memoirs of Modern PhilosophersAuthors: Julie Murray
The Good Effects of a Whimsical Study: Romance and Women’s Learning in Charlotte Lennox’s The Female QuixoteAuthor: Sharon Smith Palo
The Female Mentor in Crébillon’s Les Égarements du cœur et de l’espritAuthor: Katherine Deimling

A young woman learns about generating electricity in this engraving entitled “A New Electrical Machine for the Table,” from Benjamin Martin (1705-82), The Young Gentleman and Lady’s Philosophy, in a continued survey of the works of nature and art; by way of dialogue. … Illustrated by … copper-plates. The second edition corrected, vol. 1 (London: W. Owen, 1772). I love how science and philosophy were all mixed together in this period, with practitioners called “philosophers” well into the nineteenth century, when the term “scientist” was coined and brought into general usage.

For more about women and science/philosophy in the 18th century, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Gilles Auguste Bazin’s ‘True Novel’ of Natural History
Author: Marc Olivier

The Extraordinary Ordinary Belinda: Maria Edgeworth’s Female Philosopher
Author: Deborah Weiss

Identifying Foreign Bodies: New Philosophers and Hottentots in Elizabeth Hamilton’s Memoirs of Modern Philosophers
Author: Claire Grogan

Histories of Female Progress in Memoirs of Modern Philosophers
Authors: Julie Murray

The Good Effects of a Whimsical Study: Romance and Women’s Learning in Charlotte Lennox’s The Female Quixote
Author: Sharon Smith Palo

The Female Mentor in Crébillon’s Les Égarements du cœur et de l’esprit
Author: Katherine Deimling

Filed under science women in science 18th Century 18th century history Eighteenth-Century Fiction electricity science history