Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

Posts tagged 18th Century

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Stereotypes from the 18th century: in this illustration, “Mirth” is depicted as a rather corpulent gentleman, and “Ennui” is depicted as bent, old, and quite slender. Eating brings happiness? Frontispiece from G.M. Woodward, Eccentric excursions or, literary & pictorial sketches of countenance, character & country, in different parts of England & South Wales … Embellished with upwards of one hundred characteristic & illustrative prints (London: Allen & co., 1798), engraving by Cruickshank.
Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: latest issue is Spring 2014.

Stereotypes from the 18th century: in this illustration, “Mirth” is depicted as a rather corpulent gentleman, and “Ennui” is depicted as bent, old, and quite slender. Eating brings happiness? Frontispiece from G.M. Woodward, Eccentric excursions or, literary & pictorial sketches of countenance, character & country, in different parts of England & South Wales … Embellished with upwards of one hundred characteristic & illustrative prints (London: Allen & co., 1798), engraving by Cruickshank.

Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: latest issue is Spring 2014.

Filed under 18th-century engraving mirth ennui Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th century

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More ruins! This book is very large in size, not just page number, and also has a tight binding, so sometimes photographing the engravings is a challenge. I left these “au naturel” so you could see the lighting issues I have to deal with in the basement archives. From the book Henry Boswell, Historical descriptions of new and elegant picturesque views of the antiquities of England and Wales: being a grand copper-plate repository of elegance, taste, and entertainment. Containing a new and complete collection of superb views of all the most remarkable ruins and antient buildings, such as abbeys, castles, monasteries, priories…(London: Alex. Hogg, 1786).

Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under ruins Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th Century 18th century history history

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Experiments with water, aka “Hydraulic Engines,” from William Henry Hall (d. 1807), The new royal encyclopædia; or, Complete modern universal dictionary of arts and sciences, on a new and improved plan, In which all the respective sciences, are arranged into complete systems, and the arts digested into distinct treatises (London: C. Cooke, [1788]). This book is so enormous that it is difficult to take photos of full pages in the dark archives. I hope you can see the diving bell and the fire engine and the intricate fountains.
Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Experiments with water, aka “Hydraulic Engines,” from William Henry Hall (d. 1807), The new royal encyclopædia; or, Complete modern universal dictionary of arts and sciences, on a new and improved plan, In which all the respective sciences, are arranged into complete systems, and the arts digested into distinct treatises (London: C. Cooke, [1788]). This book is so enormous that it is difficult to take photos of full pages in the dark archives. I hope you can see the diving bell and the fire engine and the intricate fountains.

Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under 18th-century engraving science 18th-century science water fountains diving bell 18th Century Eighteenth-Century Fiction

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During the great deep freeze of 1739-40, people set up a carnival-like gathering on the completely frozen River Thames. The Frost Fair was memorialized by printing presses brought right onto the ice. Amazing that this broadside survived all these years (and winters!). Frost Fairs were only accomplished when the Thames froze completely, so it was rather an unusual event for the merchants and attendees to transact their business on the ice.
Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

During the great deep freeze of 1739-40, people set up a carnival-like gathering on the completely frozen River Thames. The Frost Fair was memorialized by printing presses brought right onto the ice. Amazing that this broadside survived all these years (and winters!). Frost Fairs were only accomplished when the Thames froze completely, so it was rather an unusual event for the merchants and attendees to transact their business on the ice.

Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under river thames Frost Fair 18th Century Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century engraving 18th-century broadside urban life city living 18th-century urban life

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I always get a good response here on Tumblr when I post printers’ ornaments, so here are three more that I found recently while searching for scientific illustrations. These ornaments are from Antoine-Yves Goguet (1716-58), De l’origine des loix, des arts, et des sciences: et de leurs progrès chez les anciens peuples (Paris: Desaint & Saillant, 1758), vol. 2. Gotta love the bow-wielding putti in the first one: they look dangerous!

Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under print culture printers' ornaments 18th-century engraving Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th Century

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Portrait of Confucious, frontispiece to vol. 1 of J.-B. Du Halde (1674-1743), The General History of China: containing a geographical, historical, chronological, political and physical description of the empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet; including an exact and particular account of their customs, manners, ceremonies, religion, arts and sciences; the whole adorn’d with curious maps, and variety of copper-plates (London: J. Watts, 1741), 3rd ed. corr.
I really cannot get enough of 18th-century travel literature, in case you haven’t already noticed. The engravings in so many of these large format travel books are positively magnificent.
For more travel literature of the 18th century, and how various cultures around the world influenced each other in that era of circumnavigation, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Portrait of Confucious, frontispiece to vol. 1 of J.-B. Du Halde (1674-1743), The General History of China: containing a geographical, historical, chronological, political and physical description of the empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet; including an exact and particular account of their customs, manners, ceremonies, religion, arts and sciences; the whole adorn’d with curious maps, and variety of copper-plates (London: J. Watts, 1741), 3rd ed. corr.

I really cannot get enough of 18th-century travel literature, in case you haven’t already noticed. The engravings in so many of these large format travel books are positively magnificent.

For more travel literature of the 18th century, and how various cultures around the world influenced each other in that era of circumnavigation, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under 18th Century 18th century history history travel writing confucius China Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century engraving

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Animal symbols for abstract concepts, or “Hieroglyphics” as the title of this page reads: calumny, vigilance, sagacity, housewifry (… what?). I am really sharing this image for the merhorse, center right of this illustration detail from Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745).
Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Animal symbols for abstract concepts, or “Hieroglyphics” as the title of this page reads: calumny, vigilance, sagacity, housewifry (… what?). I am really sharing this image for the merhorse, center right of this illustration detail from Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745).

Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under 18th-century engraving Eighteenth-Century Fiction hieroglyphics symbolism animals merhorse calumny 18th century

19 notes

A detail (!) from a plate that I’m using for the cover of the autumn issue of Eighteenth-Century Fiction (26.1). This book is enormous in page length and in physical size: Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745), vol. 1. I had to stand on tiptoe to photograph this engraving, and even then I had to take 4 photos to cover the entire illustration. This engraving purports to show people practising all of the branches of science (and the arts!): included in this slice are anatomy (A, near the skeleton on the left), medicine (B, in the middle, one-third down from the top), and chemistry (N, bottom left).
To see more about science in the 18th century, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

A detail (!) from a plate that I’m using for the cover of the autumn issue of Eighteenth-Century Fiction (26.1). This book is enormous in page length and in physical size: Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745), vol. 1. I had to stand on tiptoe to photograph this engraving, and even then I had to take 4 photos to cover the entire illustration. This engraving purports to show people practising all of the branches of science (and the arts!): included in this slice are anatomy (A, near the skeleton on the left), medicine (B, in the middle, one-third down from the top), and chemistry (N, bottom left).

To see more about science in the 18th century, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under 18th Century 18th-century science 18th-Century Art engravings 18th-century engraving book illustration