Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

Posts tagged 18th century history

27 notes

More ruins! This book is very large in size, not just page number, and also has a tight binding, so sometimes photographing the engravings is a challenge. I left these “au naturel” so you could see the lighting issues I have to deal with in the basement archives. From the book Henry Boswell, Historical descriptions of new and elegant picturesque views of the antiquities of England and Wales: being a grand copper-plate repository of elegance, taste, and entertainment. Containing a new and complete collection of superb views of all the most remarkable ruins and antient buildings, such as abbeys, castles, monasteries, priories…(London: Alex. Hogg, 1786).

For more on antiquities in 18th-century Britain, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

`The Little Republic’ of the Family: Goldsmith’s Politics of Nostalgia
Author: James P. Carson
Publication: Eighteenth-Century Fiction

Filed under ruins Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th Century 18th century history history

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A printer’s ornament featuring a library; the flourishes are more grand than the shelves of books, but I adore this print. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first “lending library” mentioned in print was in 1595. Between the mid-1600s and “the end of the eighteenth century, over two hundred endowed libraries are known to have been established in England alone, and existed due to the private library collections of individual benefactors or occasionally to multiple benefactors,” according to Wikipedia.
To learn more about people’s need to read in the 18th century, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, which are free to read in the journal’s online library [archive]:

Staging Readers ReadingAuthor: William Beatty Warner


Rousseau’s Crusoe: Or, On Learning to Read as Not MyselfAuthor: Brian McGrath

Reading Pride and PrejudiceAuthor: Patricia Howell Michaelson
Rethinking Reading: The Novel and Cultural StratificationAuthor: William Ray
'Trash, Trumpery, and Idle Time': Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and FictionAuthor: Isobel Grundy

The Politics of Seduction in British Fiction of the 1790s: The Female Reader and Julie, ou La Nouvelle HéloïseAuthor: Claire Grogan

German Quixotism, or Sentimental Reading: Musäus’s Richardson SatiresAuthor: John P. Heins

A printer’s ornament featuring a library; the flourishes are more grand than the shelves of books, but I adore this print. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first “lending library” mentioned in print was in 1595. Between the mid-1600s and “the end of the eighteenth century, over two hundred endowed libraries are known to have been established in England alone, and existed due to the private library collections of individual benefactors or occasionally to multiple benefactors,” according to Wikipedia.

To learn more about people’s need to read in the 18th century, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, which are free to read in the journal’s online library [archive]:

Staging Readers Reading
Author: William Beatty Warner

Reading Pride and Prejudice
Author: Patricia Howell Michaelson

Rethinking Reading: The Novel and Cultural Stratification
Author: William Ray

'Trash, Trumpery, and Idle Time': Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and Fiction
Author: Isobel Grundy

German Quixotism, or Sentimental Reading: Musäus’s Richardson Satires
Author: John P. Heins

Filed under 18th century history 18thcentury Eighteenth-Century Fiction library libraries 18th-century engraving 18th-Century Art 18th-century culture lending library reading readers 18th-century books

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Portrait of Confucious, frontispiece to vol. 1 of J.-B. Du Halde (1674-1743), The General History of China: containing a geographical, historical, chronological, political and physical description of the empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet; including an exact and particular account of their customs, manners, ceremonies, religion, arts and sciences; the whole adorn’d with curious maps, and variety of copper-plates (London: J. Watts, 1741), 3rd ed. corr.
I really cannot get enough of 18th-century travel literature, in case you haven’t already noticed. The engravings in so many of these large format travel books are positively magnificent.
For more travel literature of the 18th century, and how various cultures around the world influenced each other in that era of circumnavigation, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles for free at the journal archive:
Crossing Borders with Mademoiselle de Richelieu: Fiction, Gender, and the Problem of AuthenticityAuthor: Carolyn Woodward
Filming Tourism, Portraying PemberleyAuthor: Linda V. Troost
Simon Berington’s Adventures of Sig’r Gaudentio di LuccaAuthors: A.D. Harvey, Jean-Michel Racault
Consuming Indians: Tsonnonthouan, Colonialism, and the Commodification of CultureAuthor: Robbie J. Richardson
Female Favouritism, Orientalism, and the Bathing Closet in Memoirs of Count GrammontAuthor: Danielle Bobker

Portrait of Confucious, frontispiece to vol. 1 of J.-B. Du Halde (1674-1743), The General History of China: containing a geographical, historical, chronological, political and physical description of the empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet; including an exact and particular account of their customs, manners, ceremonies, religion, arts and sciences; the whole adorn’d with curious maps, and variety of copper-plates (London: J. Watts, 1741), 3rd ed. corr.

I really cannot get enough of 18th-century travel literature, in case you haven’t already noticed. The engravings in so many of these large format travel books are positively magnificent.

For more travel literature of the 18th century, and how various cultures around the world influenced each other in that era of circumnavigation, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles for free at the journal archive:

Crossing Borders with Mademoiselle de Richelieu: Fiction, Gender, and the Problem of Authenticity
Author: Carolyn Woodward

Filming Tourism, Portraying Pemberley
Author: Linda V. Troost

Simon Berington’s Adventures of Sig’r Gaudentio di Lucca
Authors: A.D. Harvey, Jean-Michel Racault

Consuming Indians: Tsonnonthouan, Colonialism, and the Commodification of Culture
Author: Robbie J. Richardson

Female Favouritism, Orientalism, and the Bathing Closet in Memoirs of Count Grammont
Author: Danielle Bobker

Filed under 18th Century 18th century history history travel writing confucius China Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century engraving

130 notes

lacedheartt:

Princess Louisa & Princess Caroline The youngest daughters of Frederick, Prince of Wales: Princess Louisa (Blue) and Princess Caroline (Yellow), by Francis Cotes circa 1767 (via KikiA19)

Adding some colour to the Tumblr this week with a few reblogs from other excellent 18th-century feeds.
Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal: archives free to read, with a two-year moving wall, at http://digitalcommons.mcmaster.ca/ecf/vol23/iss2/

lacedheartt:

Princess Louisa & Princess Caroline
The youngest daughters of Frederick, Prince of Wales: Princess Louisa (Blue) and Princess Caroline (Yellow), by Francis Cotes circa 1767 (via KikiA19)

Adding some colour to the Tumblr this week with a few reblogs from other excellent 18th-century feeds.

Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal: archives free to read, with a two-year moving wall, at http://digitalcommons.mcmaster.ca/ecf/vol23/iss2/

Filed under 18th century history 18th-Century Art Eighteenth-Century Fiction scholarly journals portrait

53 notes

This book reminds me of how much fun I used to have reading through encyclopedias and illustrated dictionaries when I was a child: yes, I was that kid. The illustrations of various trades and occupations are remarkably detailed for their small size and woodcut print technology.

To learn more about 18th-century trades, see the special issue of the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction entitled "Trades/Le Négoce."

Filed under eighteenth+century trades eighteenth-century fiction rope maker glass blower occupations jobs 18th Century 18th century history 18th-century engraving

42 notes

A young woman learns about generating electricity in this engraving entitled “A New Electrical Machine for the Table,” from Benjamin Martin (1705-82), The Young Gentleman and Lady’s Philosophy, in a continued survey of the works of nature and art; by way of dialogue. … Illustrated by … copper-plates. The second edition corrected, vol. 1 (London: W. Owen, 1772). I love how science and philosophy were all mixed together in this period, with practitioners called “philosophers” well into the nineteenth century, when the term “scientist” was coined and brought into general usage.
For more about women and science/philosophy in the 18th century, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:
Gilles Auguste Bazin’s ‘True Novel’ of Natural HistoryAuthor: Marc Olivier
The Extraordinary Ordinary Belinda: Maria Edgeworth’s Female PhilosopherAuthor: Deborah Weiss
Identifying Foreign Bodies: New Philosophers and Hottentots in Elizabeth Hamilton’s Memoirs of Modern PhilosophersAuthor: Claire Grogan
Histories of Female Progress in Memoirs of Modern PhilosophersAuthors: Julie Murray
The Good Effects of a Whimsical Study: Romance and Women’s Learning in Charlotte Lennox’s The Female QuixoteAuthor: Sharon Smith Palo
The Female Mentor in Crébillon’s Les Égarements du cœur et de l’espritAuthor: Katherine Deimling

A young woman learns about generating electricity in this engraving entitled “A New Electrical Machine for the Table,” from Benjamin Martin (1705-82), The Young Gentleman and Lady’s Philosophy, in a continued survey of the works of nature and art; by way of dialogue. … Illustrated by … copper-plates. The second edition corrected, vol. 1 (London: W. Owen, 1772). I love how science and philosophy were all mixed together in this period, with practitioners called “philosophers” well into the nineteenth century, when the term “scientist” was coined and brought into general usage.

For more about women and science/philosophy in the 18th century, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Gilles Auguste Bazin’s ‘True Novel’ of Natural History
Author: Marc Olivier

The Extraordinary Ordinary Belinda: Maria Edgeworth’s Female Philosopher
Author: Deborah Weiss

Identifying Foreign Bodies: New Philosophers and Hottentots in Elizabeth Hamilton’s Memoirs of Modern Philosophers
Author: Claire Grogan

Histories of Female Progress in Memoirs of Modern Philosophers
Authors: Julie Murray

The Good Effects of a Whimsical Study: Romance and Women’s Learning in Charlotte Lennox’s The Female Quixote
Author: Sharon Smith Palo

The Female Mentor in Crébillon’s Les Égarements du cœur et de l’esprit
Author: Katherine Deimling

Filed under science women in science 18th Century 18th century history Eighteenth-Century Fiction electricity science history

62 notes

I adore the more luscious printers’ ornaments, overflowing with peonies in the first example and several types of fruit in the second. Not many engravers signed their ornament work, but Caron was proud of his illustration in the second image, signing his name among the leaves. I’m back at work this week, but have to catch up on all the journal business, so only a brief rumination for this post.

Learn more about 18th-century print culture by reading for free online the special issue of Eighteenth-Century Fiction called "Fiction and Print Culture":

http://digitalcommons.mcmaster.ca/ecf/vol14/iss3/

Filed under 18th Century 18th century history 18th-century literature Eighteenth-Century Fiction

57 notes

People of the 18th-century leisure class knew how to entertain themselves. Painting offered hours of “heureusement,” for both the artist and the sitters. An evening filled with musical diversions was typical following supper in a wealthy household. Looks like the painter in the top image has a critic leaning over his shoulder (an early version of a troll?), and the woman at the harpsichord has a rather ardent fan leaning on her chair (let’s hope he’s just reading the sheet music so he can sing along).

To learn more about leisure time in the 18th century, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

The Middle State’: Italian Opera in Frances Burney’s Cecilia
Author: Leya Landau

Representations of the Domestic Parlour in Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa, 1747–48
Author: Karen Lipsedge

Cryptogrammatophoria: The Romance and Novelty of Losing Readers in Code
Author: Katherine Ellison

`The Little Republic’ of the Family: Goldsmith’s Politics of Nostalgia
Author: James P. Carson

And remember to submit your manuscript for consideration, for “The Senses of Humour”; call for articles here

http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~ecf/CallArticles.html

Filed under 18th century Eighteenth-Century Fiction leisure time harpsichord dogs painting music engravings upper class 18th-century literature 18th century history