Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

Posts tagged engravings

17 notes

A detail (!) from a plate that I’m using for the cover of the autumn issue of Eighteenth-Century Fiction (26.1). This book is enormous in page length and in physical size: Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745), vol. 1. I had to stand on tiptoe to photograph this engraving, and even then I had to take 4 photos to cover the entire illustration. This engraving purports to show people practising all of the branches of science (and the arts!): included in this slice are anatomy (A, near the skeleton on the left), medicine (B, in the middle, one-third down from the top), and chemistry (N, bottom left).
Read more about science in the 18th century in the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, which are free to read on the Digital Commons archive:

Gilles Auguste Bazin’s ‘True Novel’ of Natural HistoryAuthor: Marc Olivier


The Culture of Newtonianism and Shakespeare’s Editors: from Pope to JohnsonAuthor: Gefen Bar-On Santor

Letters of Recommendation and False Vizors: Physiognomy in the Novels of Henry FieldingAuthor: Graeme Tytler
The Hidden Life of Porcelainiers in Eighteenth-Century FranceAuthor: Christine A. Jones

A detail (!) from a plate that I’m using for the cover of the autumn issue of Eighteenth-Century Fiction (26.1). This book is enormous in page length and in physical size: Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745), vol. 1. I had to stand on tiptoe to photograph this engraving, and even then I had to take 4 photos to cover the entire illustration. This engraving purports to show people practising all of the branches of science (and the arts!): included in this slice are anatomy (A, near the skeleton on the left), medicine (B, in the middle, one-third down from the top), and chemistry (N, bottom left).

Read more about science in the 18th century in the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, which are free to read on the Digital Commons archive:

Letters of Recommendation and False Vizors: Physiognomy in the Novels of Henry Fielding
Author: Graeme Tytler

The Hidden Life of Porcelainiers in Eighteenth-Century France
Author: Christine A. Jones

Filed under 18th Century 18th-century science 18th-Century Art engravings 18th-century engraving book illustration

14 notes

I could easily fill this Tumblr with Hogarth engravings: so many of them are overflowing with narrative and brimming with sarcasm. I find them a great delight! The Company of Undertakers by William Hogarth (1697-1764) was issued in 1736. This early print is likely from the original engraving and is reproduced here courtesy of McMaster University Library. The people portrayed in this image are doctors and “quacks,” labelled “undertakers” based on the too-often result of their ministrations to those people suffering from illness. At the time this satirical illustration was created, the word “undertaker” carried the weight of several meanings (according to the Oxford English Dictionary), all reinforcing the irony of using it as a label for these “physicks” and doctors: “One who aids or assists; a helper.” “One who engages in the serious study of a subject or science.” “One who acts as security or surety for another.” as well as the funeral arranger.
For more on doctors, the practice of medicine, and funerals, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:
Last Rites, Last Rights: Corporeal Abjection as Autobiographical Performance in Suzanne Curchod Necker’s Des inhumations précipitées (1790)Author: Sonja Boon
The Body Inside the Skin: The Medical Model of Character in the Eighteenth-Century NovelAuthor: Juliet McMaster
Conversion, Seduction, and Medicine in Smollett’s Ferdinand Count FathomAuthor: John McAllister
Biography as Autopsy in William Godwin’s Memoirs of the Author of ‘A Vindication of the Rights of Woman’Author: Angela Monsam

I could easily fill this Tumblr with Hogarth engravings: so many of them are overflowing with narrative and brimming with sarcasm. I find them a great delight! The Company of Undertakers by William Hogarth (1697-1764) was issued in 1736. This early print is likely from the original engraving and is reproduced here courtesy of McMaster University Library. The people portrayed in this image are doctors and “quacks,” labelled “undertakers” based on the too-often result of their ministrations to those people suffering from illness. At the time this satirical illustration was created, the word “undertaker” carried the weight of several meanings (according to the Oxford English Dictionary), all reinforcing the irony of using it as a label for these “physicks” and doctors: “One who aids or assists; a helper.” “One who engages in the serious study of a subject or science.” “One who acts as security or surety for another.” as well as the funeral arranger.

For more on doctors, the practice of medicine, and funerals, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Last Rites, Last Rights: Corporeal Abjection as Autobiographical Performance in Suzanne Curchod Necker’s Des inhumations précipitées (1790)
Author: Sonja Boon

The Body Inside the Skin: The Medical Model of Character in the Eighteenth-Century Novel
Author: Juliet McMaster

Conversion, Seduction, and Medicine in Smollett’s Ferdinand Count Fathom
Author: John McAllister

Biography as Autopsy in William Godwin’s Memoirs of the Author of ‘A Vindication of the Rights of Woman’
Author: Angela Monsam

Filed under William Hogarth undertakers 18th-century engraving engravings etchings satire Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century history medicine funerals medical history

57 notes

People of the 18th-century leisure class knew how to entertain themselves. Painting offered hours of “heureusement,” for both the artist and the sitters. An evening filled with musical diversions was typical following supper in a wealthy household. Looks like the painter in the top image has a critic leaning over his shoulder (an early version of a troll?), and the woman at the harpsichord has a rather ardent fan leaning on her chair (let’s hope he’s just reading the sheet music so he can sing along).

To learn more about leisure time in the 18th century, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

The Middle State’: Italian Opera in Frances Burney’s Cecilia
Author: Leya Landau

Representations of the Domestic Parlour in Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa, 1747–48
Author: Karen Lipsedge

Cryptogrammatophoria: The Romance and Novelty of Losing Readers in Code
Author: Katherine Ellison

`The Little Republic’ of the Family: Goldsmith’s Politics of Nostalgia
Author: James P. Carson

And remember to submit your manuscript for consideration, for “The Senses of Humour”; call for articles here

http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~ecf/CallArticles.html

Filed under 18th century Eighteenth-Century Fiction leisure time harpsichord dogs painting music engravings upper class 18th-century literature 18th century history

20 notes

The 1790 edition of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe includes the original novel in volume 1, lushly illustrated by Thomas Stothard (engr. Thomas Medland), and adds the sequel as a bonus in volume 2. The story of The Farther Adventures of Robinson Crusoe provides just as many great plot points for illustration.

To read more about Robinson Crusoe, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles, free to read on the journal’s archive:

'A Living Law to Himself and Others': Daniel Defoe, Algernon Sidney, and the Politics of Self-Interest in Robinson Crusoe and Farther Adventures
Author: Coby Dowdell

The Cave and the Grotto: Realist Form and Robinson Crusoe’s Imagined Interiors
Author: Maximillian E. Novak

The Myth of Cronus: Cannibal and Sign in Robinson Crusoe
Author: Dianne Armstrong

Crusoe in the Cave: Defoe and the Semiotics of Desire
Author: Geoffrey M. Sill

How to Say Things with Guns: Military Technology and the Politics of Robinson Crusoe
Author: Christopher F. Loar

Filed under 18th Century 1790 robinson crusoe Daniel Defoe Eighteenth-Century Fiction engravings Thomas Stothard

25 notes

Ever wonder what these authors from the long eighteenth century looked like? Some publishers used author portraits to face title pages, as current publishers do with author photos on the jacket or back cover.

For more on the personalities behind these portraits, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

The Body of Her Work, the Work of Her Body: Accounting for the Life and Death of Mary Wollstonecraft
Author: Cynthia Richards

'Trash, Trumpery, and Idle Time': Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and Fiction
Author: Isobel Grundy

Filed under 18th Century 18th-century literature Eighteenth-Century Fiction author portraits eighteenth-century authors engravings literature