Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

Posts tagged engravings

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A detail (!) from a plate that I’m using for the cover of the autumn issue of Eighteenth-Century Fiction (26.1). This book is enormous in page length and in physical size: Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745), vol. 1. I had to stand on tiptoe to photograph this engraving, and even then I had to take 4 photos to cover the entire illustration. This engraving purports to show people practising all of the branches of science (and the arts!): included in this slice are anatomy (A, near the skeleton on the left), medicine (B, in the middle, one-third down from the top), and chemistry (N, bottom left).
To see more about science in the 18th century, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

A detail (!) from a plate that I’m using for the cover of the autumn issue of Eighteenth-Century Fiction (26.1). This book is enormous in page length and in physical size: Dennis De Coetlogon, An Universal History of Arts and Sciences; Or, A Comprehensive Illustration, Definition, and Description of All Sciences, Divine and Human; and of All Arts, Liberal and Mechanical (London: J. Hart, 1745), vol. 1. I had to stand on tiptoe to photograph this engraving, and even then I had to take 4 photos to cover the entire illustration. This engraving purports to show people practising all of the branches of science (and the arts!): included in this slice are anatomy (A, near the skeleton on the left), medicine (B, in the middle, one-third down from the top), and chemistry (N, bottom left).

To see more about science in the 18th century, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under 18th Century 18th-century science 18th-Century Art engravings 18th-century engraving book illustration

14 notes

I could easily fill this Tumblr with Hogarth engravings: so many of them are overflowing with narrative and brimming with sarcasm. I find them a great delight! The Company of Undertakers by William Hogarth (1697-1764) was issued in 1736. This early print is likely from the original engraving and is reproduced here courtesy of McMaster University Library. The people portrayed in this image are doctors and “quacks,” labelled “undertakers” based on the too-often result of their ministrations to those people suffering from illness. At the time this satirical illustration was created, the word “undertaker” carried the weight of several meanings (according to the Oxford English Dictionary), all reinforcing the irony of using it as a label for these “physicks” and doctors: “One who aids or assists; a helper.” “One who engages in the serious study of a subject or science.” “One who acts as security or surety for another.” as well as the funeral arranger.
To see more on doctors, the practice of medicine, and funerals, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

I could easily fill this Tumblr with Hogarth engravings: so many of them are overflowing with narrative and brimming with sarcasm. I find them a great delight! The Company of Undertakers by William Hogarth (1697-1764) was issued in 1736. This early print is likely from the original engraving and is reproduced here courtesy of McMaster University Library. The people portrayed in this image are doctors and “quacks,” labelled “undertakers” based on the too-often result of their ministrations to those people suffering from illness. At the time this satirical illustration was created, the word “undertaker” carried the weight of several meanings (according to the Oxford English Dictionary), all reinforcing the irony of using it as a label for these “physicks” and doctors: “One who aids or assists; a helper.” “One who engages in the serious study of a subject or science.” “One who acts as security or surety for another.” as well as the funeral arranger.

To see more on doctors, the practice of medicine, and funerals, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under William Hogarth undertakers 18th-century engraving engravings etchings satire Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century history medicine funerals medical history

60 notes

People of the 18th-century leisure class knew how to entertain themselves. Painting offered hours of “heureusement,” for both the artist and the sitters. An evening filled with musical diversions was typical following supper in a wealthy household. Looks like the painter in the top image has a critic leaning over his shoulder (an early version of a troll?), and the woman at the harpsichord has a rather ardent fan leaning on her chair (let’s hope he’s just reading the sheet music so he can sing along).

To learn more about leisure time in the 18th century, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under 18th century Eighteenth-Century Fiction leisure time harpsichord dogs painting music engravings upper class 18th-century literature 18th century history

20 notes

The 1790 edition of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe includes the original novel in volume 1, lushly illustrated by Thomas Stothard (engr. Thomas Medland), and adds the sequel as a bonus in volume 2. The story of The Farther Adventures of Robinson Crusoe provides just as many great plot points for illustration.

To see more about Robinson Crusoe, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under 18th Century 1790 robinson crusoe Daniel Defoe Eighteenth-Century Fiction engravings Thomas Stothard

25 notes

Ever wonder what these authors from the long eighteenth century looked like? Some publishers used author portraits to face title pages, as current publishers do with author photos on the jacket or back cover.

For more on the personalities behind these portraits, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under 18th Century 18th-century literature Eighteenth-Century Fiction author portraits eighteenth-century authors engravings literature