Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

Posts tagged history

27 notes

More ruins! This book is very large in size, not just page number, and also has a tight binding, so sometimes photographing the engravings is a challenge. I left these “au naturel” so you could see the lighting issues I have to deal with in the basement archives. From the book Henry Boswell, Historical descriptions of new and elegant picturesque views of the antiquities of England and Wales: being a grand copper-plate repository of elegance, taste, and entertainment. Containing a new and complete collection of superb views of all the most remarkable ruins and antient buildings, such as abbeys, castles, monasteries, priories…(London: Alex. Hogg, 1786).

For more on antiquities in 18th-century Britain, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

`The Little Republic’ of the Family: Goldsmith’s Politics of Nostalgia
Author: James P. Carson
Publication: Eighteenth-Century Fiction

Filed under ruins Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th Century 18th century history history

6 notes

Portrait of Confucious, frontispiece to vol. 1 of J.-B. Du Halde (1674-1743), The General History of China: containing a geographical, historical, chronological, political and physical description of the empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet; including an exact and particular account of their customs, manners, ceremonies, religion, arts and sciences; the whole adorn’d with curious maps, and variety of copper-plates (London: J. Watts, 1741), 3rd ed. corr.
I really cannot get enough of 18th-century travel literature, in case you haven’t already noticed. The engravings in so many of these large format travel books are positively magnificent.
For more travel literature of the 18th century, and how various cultures around the world influenced each other in that era of circumnavigation, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles for free at the journal archive:
Crossing Borders with Mademoiselle de Richelieu: Fiction, Gender, and the Problem of AuthenticityAuthor: Carolyn Woodward
Filming Tourism, Portraying PemberleyAuthor: Linda V. Troost
Simon Berington’s Adventures of Sig’r Gaudentio di LuccaAuthors: A.D. Harvey, Jean-Michel Racault
Consuming Indians: Tsonnonthouan, Colonialism, and the Commodification of CultureAuthor: Robbie J. Richardson
Female Favouritism, Orientalism, and the Bathing Closet in Memoirs of Count GrammontAuthor: Danielle Bobker

Portrait of Confucious, frontispiece to vol. 1 of J.-B. Du Halde (1674-1743), The General History of China: containing a geographical, historical, chronological, political and physical description of the empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet; including an exact and particular account of their customs, manners, ceremonies, religion, arts and sciences; the whole adorn’d with curious maps, and variety of copper-plates (London: J. Watts, 1741), 3rd ed. corr.

I really cannot get enough of 18th-century travel literature, in case you haven’t already noticed. The engravings in so many of these large format travel books are positively magnificent.

For more travel literature of the 18th century, and how various cultures around the world influenced each other in that era of circumnavigation, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles for free at the journal archive:

Crossing Borders with Mademoiselle de Richelieu: Fiction, Gender, and the Problem of Authenticity
Author: Carolyn Woodward

Filming Tourism, Portraying Pemberley
Author: Linda V. Troost

Simon Berington’s Adventures of Sig’r Gaudentio di Lucca
Authors: A.D. Harvey, Jean-Michel Racault

Consuming Indians: Tsonnonthouan, Colonialism, and the Commodification of Culture
Author: Robbie J. Richardson

Female Favouritism, Orientalism, and the Bathing Closet in Memoirs of Count Grammont
Author: Danielle Bobker

Filed under 18th Century 18th century history history travel writing confucius China Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century engraving

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anacharsisclootz:

Mrs. Jordan in the Character of Hippolyta, painting by John Hoppner.
Dorothea Jordan (21 November 1761 – 5 July 1816) was an Anglo-Irish actress, courtesan, and the mistress and companion of the future King William IV of the United Kingdom, for 20 years while he was Duke of Clarence. Together they had ten illegitimate children, all of whom took the surname FitzClarence.
This portrait shows her in one of her most popular ‘breeches’ roles in Cibber’s ‘She Would and She Would Not’, where she dresses as a young soldier to follow her lover to Madrid.

Spectacular!

anacharsisclootz:

Mrs. Jordan in the Character of Hippolyta, painting by John Hoppner.

Dorothea Jordan (21 November 1761 – 5 July 1816) was an Anglo-Irish actress, courtesan, and the mistress and companion of the future King William IV of the United Kingdom, for 20 years while he was Duke of Clarence. Together they had ten illegitimate children, all of whom took the surname FitzClarence.

This portrait shows her in one of her most popular ‘breeches’ roles in Cibber’s ‘She Would and She Would Not’, where she dresses as a young soldier to follow her lover to Madrid.

Spectacular!

Filed under 18th-Century Art history 18th-century history john hoppner

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The archives at McMaster University (Research Collections, Mills Library) hold so many amazing books on worldwide travels during the eighteenth century, and these tomes are often filled with spectacular illustrations. Today, three animals from one book: I found Goat, Buffalo, and Camel in A collection of late voyages and travels, chiefly translated and abridged from the French and other foreign publications of Neihbur, Mariti, Beauchamp, &c. &c. The whole forming a body of important and amusing information, concerning the present state of manners, of arts and literature, of religion and government, … With 12 plates, and a map of Asia, by Beauchamp, Alph. de, 1767-1832, Ferrières-Sauvebœuf, Louis-François, comte de, 1762-1814, Mariti, Giovanni, 1736-1806, Niebuhr, Carsten, 1733-1815., Heron, Robert, 1764-1807 ([Edinburgh]: Watson and Co., Edinburgh, and J. Hamilton, London, 1797).

Deadline for special issue submissions has been pushed back to 1 July 2013: please send in your scholarly essays for “The Senses of Humour.” For further details, see the Call for Articles for “The Senses of Humour.”

Filed under animals history 18th Century travel writing Eighteenth-Century Fiction goat buffalo camel

33 notes

The Pan-STARRS comet passes in view of northern hemisphere skywatchers this week, a magnificent sight, much like the return of Halley’s comet in 1759. Caroline Herschel discovered many comets during her astronomical studies in the late 18th century. This image, not exactly of Caroline Herschel but it made me think of her, is from Benjamin Martin (1705-82), The Young Gentleman and Lady’s Philosophy, in a continued survey of the works of nature and art; by way of dialogue. … Illustrated by … copper-plates. The second edition corrected, vol. 1, frontispiece (London: W. Owen), 1772. In a century that often discouraged women from studying and participating in the sciences, this book offers an open-minded attitude to educating all young people.
For more about women and science in the 18th century, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

Gilles Auguste Bazin’s ‘True Novel’ of Natural HistoryAuthor: Marc Olivier


Making Mother Obsolete: Eliza Fenwick’s Secresy and the Masculine Appropriation of MaternityAuthor: Meghan L. Burke


Interiors and Interiority in the Ornamental DairyAuthor: Meredith Martin


Intertextual Conversations: The Love-Letter and the Footnote in Madame de Graffigny’s Lettres d’une PéruvienneAuthor: Aurora Wolfgang

The Extraordinary Ordinary Belinda: Maria Edgeworth’s Female PhilosopherAuthor: Deborah Weiss

The Pan-STARRS comet passes in view of northern hemisphere skywatchers this week, a magnificent sight, much like the return of Halley’s comet in 1759. Caroline Herschel discovered many comets during her astronomical studies in the late 18th century. This image, not exactly of Caroline Herschel but it made me think of her, is from Benjamin Martin (1705-82), The Young Gentleman and Lady’s Philosophy, in a continued survey of the works of nature and art; by way of dialogue. … Illustrated by … copper-plates. The second edition corrected, vol. 1, frontispiece (London: W. Owen), 1772. In a century that often discouraged women from studying and participating in the sciences, this book offers an open-minded attitude to educating all young people.

For more about women and science in the 18th century, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles:

The Extraordinary Ordinary Belinda: Maria Edgeworth’s Female Philosopher
Author: Deborah Weiss

Filed under 18th Century astronomy comets Eighteenth-Century Fiction women in science History eighteenth century 18th-century literature