Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

Posts tagged landscape

9 notes

A View of the City of Carlisle” from Tobias Smollett, The Present State of All Nations, Containing a Geographical, Natural, Commercial, and Political History of All the Countries in the Known World (London, 1768), opp. 282; and “A View of Glasgow”, opp. 103. [An ambitious tome!]

For more on Tobias Smollett and his literary efforts, read the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles [free to read on the journal’s archive at Digital Commons]:

"Fools of Prejudice": Sympathy and National Identity in the Scottish Enlightenment and Humphry Clinker
Author: Evan Gottlieb

Tobias Smollett, Anthony Walker, and the First Illustrated Serial Novel in English
Author: Robert Folkenflik

Fathoming Intelligence: The ‘Impartial’ Novelist and the Passion for News in Tobias Smollett’s Ferdinand Count Fathom
Author: Lee F. Kahan

"The Tinsel of the Times": Smollett’s Argument against Conspicuous Consumption in Humphry Clinker
Author: Susan L. Jacobsen

Filed under 18th+century historical geography eighteenth century Eighteenth-Century Fiction tobias smollett Carlisle Glasgow 18th-century history cityscapes landscape scenery city

7 notes

Tumblr Tuesday, in Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal style! Humphry Repton was a rock star in the world of late eighteenth-century landscaping: he coined the phrase “landscape gardening,” explaining that the beauties of a property could only be expertly presented by combining the powers of a landscape painter and a practical gardener. To impress his prospective clients, he showed them aquatints of vistas from certain properties and used sliding panels inset in the book to reveal the “after” image showcasing what he could do with a little earth-moving and bridge-building or ruins-fabrication.
For more on eighteenth-century landscape and other types of architecture, see the following ECF articles: “'Where the World May Ne'er Invade'? Green Retreats and Garden Theatre in La Princesse de Clèves, The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless, and Cecilia,” by J. David Macey Jr; “'Unbecoming Conjunctions': Mourning the Loss of Landscape and Love in Persuasion,” by Jill Heydt-Stevenson; “Sterne, Sebald, and Siege Architecture,” by Jonathan Lamb; “Visiting Strawberry Hill: Horace Walpole’s Gothic Historiography,” by Sean R. Silver.

Tumblr Tuesday, in Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal style! Humphry Repton was a rock star in the world of late eighteenth-century landscaping: he coined the phrase “landscape gardening,” explaining that the beauties of a property could only be expertly presented by combining the powers of a landscape painter and a practical gardener. To impress his prospective clients, he showed them aquatints of vistas from certain properties and used sliding panels inset in the book to reveal the “after” image showcasing what he could do with a little earth-moving and bridge-building or ruins-fabrication.

For more on eighteenth-century landscape and other types of architecture, see the following ECF articles: “'Where the World May Ne'er Invade'? Green Retreats and Garden Theatre in La Princesse de Clèves, The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless, and Cecilia,” by J. David Macey Jr; “'Unbecoming Conjunctions': Mourning the Loss of Landscape and Love in Persuasion,” by Jill Heydt-Stevenson; “Sterne, Sebald, and Siege Architecture,” by Jonathan Lamb; “Visiting Strawberry Hill: Horace Walpole’s Gothic Historiography,” by Sean R. Silver.

Filed under eighteenth century Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th Century 18th-century literature landscape landscape gardening Humphry Repton landscape architecture