Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

Posts tagged military illustrations

26 notes

Military utensils and the rather extravagant plan for an impregnable fortress, from The Field of Mars: being an alphabetical digestion of the principal naval and military engagements, in Europe, Asia, Africa, and America, particularly of Great Britain and her allies, from the ninth century to the present period (London:J. Macgowan, 1781), vol. 2.

To learn more about warfare in the 18th-century and how it was depicted in fiction and other literary genres, see the following Eighteenth-Century Fiction articles on the journal’s archive: read them for free!

Special issue “War/La Guerre.”

Other articles:

A Tale of Two Tactics: Laclos’s Novel Approach to Military Crisis and Reform
Author: Julia Anne Osman

Warfare and Its Discontents in Eighteenth-Century Fiction: Or, Why Eighteenth-Century Fiction Failed to Produce a War and Peace
Author: Maximillian E. Novak

"A Romance the likest to Truth that I ever read": History, Fiction, and Politics in Defoe’s Memoirs of a Cavalier
Author: Nicholas Seager

The Crocodile Strikes Back: Saint Martin’s Interpretation of the French Revolution
Author: Fabienne Moore

Filed under warfare 18th-century war history of war Eighteenth-Century Fiction fortress military utensils military instruments military illustrations war

21 notes

Finally some colour! A scene from Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman: Uncle Toby in his sentry box. After sustaining a serious wound in battle, Uncle Toby retires from the armed forces, spending most of his time obsessing about the history and science of military fortifications.
To learn more about one of the most original novels ever published,Tristram Shandy, see the followingEighteenth-Century Fictionarticles:
The Moral in Phutatorius’s Breeches: Tristram Shandy and the Limits of Stoic EthicsAuthor: Brian Michael Norton
Homunculus Economicus: Laurence Sterne’s Labour Theory of Literary ValueAuthor: Scott R. MacKenzie
Divine Enthusiasm and Love Melancholy: Tristram Shandy and Eighteenth-Century Narratives of Saint ErrantryAuthor: Oliver Lovesey
Les Illustrations du Voyage Sentimental de Laurence Sterne dans les livres du XVIIle siècleAuthor: Madeleine Blondel
Stories of COCKS and BULLS: The Ending of Tristram ShandyAuthor: Mark Loveridge

Finally some colour! A scene from Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman: Uncle Toby in his sentry box. After sustaining a serious wound in battle, Uncle Toby retires from the armed forces, spending most of his time obsessing about the history and science of military fortifications.

To learn more about one of the most original novels ever published,Tristram Shandy, see the followingEighteenth-Century Fictionarticles:

The Moral in Phutatorius’s Breeches: Tristram Shandy and the Limits of Stoic Ethics
Author: Brian Michael Norton

Homunculus Economicus: Laurence Sterne’s Labour Theory of Literary Value
Author: Scott R. MacKenzie

Divine Enthusiasm and Love Melancholy: Tristram Shandy and Eighteenth-Century Narratives of Saint Errantry
Author: Oliver Lovesey

Les Illustrations du Voyage Sentimental de Laurence Sterne dans les livres du XVIIle siècle
Author: Madeleine Blondel

Stories of COCKS and BULLS: The Ending of Tristram Shandy
Author: Mark Loveridge

Filed under 18th Century Tristram Shandy Eighteenth-Century Fiction military illustrations 18th-century literature eighteenth century Laurence Sterne