Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

Posts tagged satire

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I could easily fill this Tumblr with Hogarth engravings: so many of them are overflowing with narrative and brimming with sarcasm. I find them a great delight! The Company of Undertakers by William Hogarth (1697-1764) was issued in 1736. This early print is likely from the original engraving and is reproduced here courtesy of McMaster University Library. The people portrayed in this image are doctors and “quacks,” labelled “undertakers” based on the too-often result of their ministrations to those people suffering from illness. At the time this satirical illustration was created, the word “undertaker” carried the weight of several meanings (according to the Oxford English Dictionary), all reinforcing the irony of using it as a label for these “physicks” and doctors: “One who aids or assists; a helper.” “One who engages in the serious study of a subject or science.” “One who acts as security or surety for another.” as well as the funeral arranger.
To see more on doctors, the practice of medicine, and funerals, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

I could easily fill this Tumblr with Hogarth engravings: so many of them are overflowing with narrative and brimming with sarcasm. I find them a great delight! The Company of Undertakers by William Hogarth (1697-1764) was issued in 1736. This early print is likely from the original engraving and is reproduced here courtesy of McMaster University Library. The people portrayed in this image are doctors and “quacks,” labelled “undertakers” based on the too-often result of their ministrations to those people suffering from illness. At the time this satirical illustration was created, the word “undertaker” carried the weight of several meanings (according to the Oxford English Dictionary), all reinforcing the irony of using it as a label for these “physicks” and doctors: “One who aids or assists; a helper.” “One who engages in the serious study of a subject or science.” “One who acts as security or surety for another.” as well as the funeral arranger.

To see more on doctors, the practice of medicine, and funerals, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under William Hogarth undertakers 18th-century engraving engravings etchings satire Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century history medicine funerals medical history

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Feminism or hooliganism? This image can inspire so many interpretations. I would rather stick with the most obvious reading: a bunch of people enjoying the snow. Except, the older fellow getting pelted with snowballs is definitely having no fun at that moment in this caricature. The January before this engraving was published in May 1794, Scotland suffered through an exceptional snowstorm that killed more than 1,800 sheep, several people, and many other animals. Perhaps the magnitude of that weather event stuck in the artist’s mind when he was drawing this satirical depiction of his “Old Buck,” in the balmy spring of 1794.
For more on feminism in eighteenth-century literature and culture, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Feminism or hooliganism? This image can inspire so many interpretations. I would rather stick with the most obvious reading: a bunch of people enjoying the snow. Except, the older fellow getting pelted with snowballs is definitely having no fun at that moment in this caricature. The January before this engraving was published in May 1794, Scotland suffered through an exceptional snowstorm that killed more than 1,800 sheep, several people, and many other animals. Perhaps the magnitude of that weather event stuck in the artist’s mind when he was drawing this satirical depiction of his “Old Buck,” in the balmy spring of 1794.

For more on feminism in eighteenth-century literature and culture, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under 18th Century feminism snowballs Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th-century literature satire caricature prints eighteenth century

37 notes

"Fashion Police," the 1796-99 edition. Plate 122 from Joseph Strutt, A Complete View of the Dress and Habits of the People of England 2 vols. (London, 1796-99), pokes fun at women’s elaborate headdresses in previous centuries. [You must know that I’m actually posting this image for the harp-playing pig on stilts!]
For more on satire, fashion, and consumption, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

"Fashion Police," the 1796-99 edition. Plate 122 from Joseph Strutt, A Complete View of the Dress and Habits of the People of England 2 vols. (London, 1796-99), pokes fun at women’s elaborate headdresses in previous centuries. [You must know that I’m actually posting this image for the harp-playing pig on stilts!]

For more on satire, fashion, and consumption, read Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal online via institutional subscription at Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/eighteenth_century_fiction/

Filed under eighteenth century fashion headdresses 18th-century literature Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18th Century satire consumption