Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal

Eighteenth-Century Fiction, a McMaster University journal

Posts tagged trades

53 notes

This book reminds me of how much fun I used to have reading through encyclopedias and illustrated dictionaries when I was a child: yes, I was that kid. The illustrations of various trades and occupations are remarkably detailed for their small size and woodcut print technology.

To learn more about 18th-century trades, see the special issue of the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction entitled "Trades/Le Négoce."

Filed under eighteenth+century trades eighteenth-century fiction rope maker glass blower occupations jobs 18th Century 18th century history 18th-century engraving

21 notes

Raptors feature in the news lately in my region: Peregrine Falcons nest on the downtown Sheraton Hotel, and Bald Eagles premier their first chicks in a little corner of Cootes Paradise. This engraving depicting falconry in mid-eighteenth-century India caught my eye when I was looking for pictures of different cultures. I didn’t take the best photo of it, so I thought the sepia tone might help bring out the details a little, and thank goodness for a bit of Photoshop adjusting: those archive rooms in the basement of the library are really quite dark. This illustration comes from Richard Owen Cambridge (1717-1802), An Account of the War in India, between the English and French, on the coast of Coromandel, from the year 1750 to the year 1760. Together with a relation of the late remarkable events on the Malabar coast, and the expeditions to Golconda and Surat (London: T. Jefferys, 1761), plate 2, opp. p. xiv.
The Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal archive at Digital Commons attracts readers from all over the world, more than 5,000 every month! The latest issue that is free to read is the special issue “Trades/Le Négoce,” which contains essays on such diverse cultural studies topics as porcelain makers, lemonade sellers, and clothing trade cards.

Raptors feature in the news lately in my region: Peregrine Falcons nest on the downtown Sheraton Hotel, and Bald Eagles premier their first chicks in a little corner of Cootes Paradise. This engraving depicting falconry in mid-eighteenth-century India caught my eye when I was looking for pictures of different cultures. I didn’t take the best photo of it, so I thought the sepia tone might help bring out the details a little, and thank goodness for a bit of Photoshop adjusting: those archive rooms in the basement of the library are really quite dark. This illustration comes from Richard Owen Cambridge (1717-1802), An Account of the War in India, between the English and French, on the coast of Coromandel, from the year 1750 to the year 1760. Together with a relation of the late remarkable events on the Malabar coast, and the expeditions to Golconda and Surat (London: T. Jefferys, 1761), plate 2, opp. p. xiv.

The Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal archive at Digital Commons attracts readers from all over the world, more than 5,000 every month! The latest issue that is free to read is the special issue “Trades/Le Négoce,” which contains essays on such diverse cultural studies topics as porcelain makers, lemonade sellers, and clothing trade cards.

Filed under 18th Century falcons Eighteenth-Century Fiction Trades 18th-century literature raptors India

30 notes

G. Morland, The Labourer’s Luncheon
Thanks to some excellent assistance in the McMaster University Research Collections, I found a few colourful plates from the eighteenth century to photograph. This is “No. 8” in a series by George Morland (1763-1804) called The Labourer’s Luncheon. No. 8 The Labourer’s Luncheon was published on 20 Dec. 1797, engraved by C. Tosi, printed by I.R. Smith in London. That dog is waiting for any little crumb to fall, watching so intently.
To learn more about labourers and the trades in the eighteenth century, please read the special issue of the McMaster University journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction, entitled “Trades/Le Négoce.” This special issue is free to read on the journal’s archive at Digital Commons @ McMaster: ECF vol. 23, no. 2.
 

G. Morland, The Labourer’s Luncheon

Thanks to some excellent assistance in the McMaster University Research Collections, I found a few colourful plates from the eighteenth century to photograph. This is “No. 8” in a series by George Morland (1763-1804) called The Labourer’s Luncheon. No. 8 The Labourer’s Luncheon was published on 20 Dec. 1797, engraved by C. Tosi, printed by I.R. Smith in London. That dog is waiting for any little crumb to fall, watching so intently.

To learn more about labourers and the trades in the eighteenth century, please read the special issue of the McMaster University journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction, entitled “Trades/Le Négoce.” This special issue is free to read on the journal’s archive at Digital Commons @ McMaster: ECF vol. 23, no. 2.

 

Filed under 18th century 18th-century literature labourers trades lunch Eighteenth-Century Fiction eighteenth century painting George Morland La Negoce